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Atlanterhavsveien 27. desember 2011

 

How would you like the job of building this road? Reminds me of the seven mile bridge in the Florida Keys.
 
The road is built on several small islands and reefs, and is crossed by eight bridges, several roads and overpasses. This road has a view of the open sea, which is rare
on the roads along the Norwegian coast. You can see fjords and mountains near the road. The spectacular road quickly became a tourist attraction, insofar precautions should
be displayed while driving, because of the attendance of the road by the local population and visitors. Imagine you are driving
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Dear Friends,The other day, I walked into an Asian stir-fry eatery and was met with a row of touchscreens lined up in front of the kitchen area where employees were preparing the food. The normal conversation one would usually hear between customers and the person behind the counter was strangely absent. Instead, I found myself and two or three millennial-types silently staring down at the touchscreens and ordering our food with a series of finger taps. We even swiped our own credit cards on a little console that also printed out our receipts. Similarly, instead of going to the bank with a check to deposit and having a friendly interaction with the bank teller, we can now deposit our checks ourselves with the cameras on our phones.All of this technology has certainly made our lives more convenient in certain ways, but it also has a weird way of making everyday life seem robotic. We aren’t being “old-fashioned” when we feel that something vital is missing from our lives when the opportunities for friendly chit-chat are systematically removed from commonplace societal activities.The desire for genuine human contact isn’t merely a “nicety” that some of us choose to do from time to time. This desire was placed in all human hearts by our Creator. Think of how Jesus interacted with those around him. He didn’t sit on pedestal and heal people from afar—rather, he did not hesitate in holding children in his lap, touching lepers, and even spitting on a blind man’s eyes to heal them. This is the kind of God we have, one whose deepest desire is to reach out and touch us. We in turn desire to give and receive genuine touch. Never underestimate the power that a warm handshake or a friendly pat on the back can have. A sincere embrace of someone who is struggling can have an enormous impact. Even something as seemingly insignificant as a smile and a friendly “hello” has the power to immediately lift our spirits.It’s particularly important to not miss an opportunity to be both verbally and physically affectionate with our spouses and children, which strengthens the bond of our family units. Thank you for your prayers and for your continued support of FRC and the family.Sincerely,Dan Hart Managing Editor for Publications Family Research Council FRC ArticlesNew Brochure: How to Respond to the LGBT Movement – Peter SpriggThe SPLC’s Incursion into EducationWith vote against Brownback, Democrats abandon religious freedom – Travis WeberPresident is keeping his promises – Tony PerkinsFact-Checking Jimmy Kimmel on Christian Bakers: Two Big Errors, But Props for Trying – Travis WeberGeneration Z – Seeking Answers to Good and Evil – Travis WeberAn Ode to the Lincoln Memorial – Brynne KrispinPain-Capable Senate Vote: The One Percenters’ Club – Jay Sappington4 Unforgettable Thoughts On Marriage – Dan HartWith Cecile Richards’ Resignation, It’s Time for Planned Parenthood to Come Clean – Jay Sappington Religious LibertyReligious Liberty in the Public SquareJudge Rules Bakeshop Owner Doesn’t Have to Bake Wedding Cake for Gay Couple – Grace Carr, The Daily SignalNorth Carolina Settles With Magistrate It Forced Out for Not Doing Gay Marriages – Ken McIntyre, The Daily SignalMichigan Pastor Facing Death Threats for Offering Workshops to Teens Struggling with Homosexuality – Charlene Aaron, CBN NewsGovernor Cuomo Signs Executive Order Banning State Agencies From Doing Business With Companies That Promote, Tolerate Discrimination – LongIsland.comCalifornia Moves To Force Public Universities To Administer Abortion Pills – Kristan Hawkins, The FederalistMaryland city to church: Stop worship services or leave – Alliance Defending FreedomOhio high school rallies around prayer after outside group tries to ban it at events – Caleb Parke and Michelle Chavez, Fox NewsInternational Religious Freedom16,000 Christians Dead in Less Than 3 Years: Report Reveals Extent of Violence in Nigeria – Stoyan Zaimov, The Christian PostImpressions of persecution – June Cheng, WORLDSudan government demolishes church just hours after service – J-P Mauro, AleteiaReligious Discrimination in Canada – Derek Ross, Public DiscourseUS Pastor Andrew Brunson Writes Heartbreaking Message to Wife From Turkish Prison – Stoyan Zaimov, The Christian PostOpen Doors Rebuilds Nearly 700 Christian Homes Destroyed by ISIS in Nineveh Plains – Samuel Smith, The Christian Post LifeAbortionBeyond Roe: A Global Roadmap for the Pro-Life Movement – Stefano Gennarini, Public DiscourseBrother of woman who died from abortion at Planned Parenthood: Abortion is not a safe procedure – Live ActionOnly Pro-Lifers Address Abortion’s Core Moral Question – Mene Ukueberuwa, National ReviewThe Emerging Pro-Life Majority – Rob Schwarzwalder, The Stream'Fetal heartbeat' abortion bill advances in Iowa Senate after contentious hearing – William Petroski, Des Moines RegisterMissouri House Passes Pro-Life Bill Requiring Parental Notification Before a Teen’s Abortion – Micaiah Bilger, LifeNewsAdoptionFive Reasons Adoption Shouldn’t be a Backup Plan – John Prather, The StreamPro-Life Advocates Celebrate: Lawmakers Pass Funding for Florida Pregnancy Support Network – Leon Aprile, Orlando Political ObserverBioethicsEuthanizing The Mentally Ill Just Lets Their Illness Win – A.D.P. Efferson, The Federalist FamilyEconomics/EducationTax Revenues Up Big After GOP Tax Cut – James Barrett, The Daily WireSorry, NYT: For Child Poverty, Family Structure Still Matters – W. Bradford Wilcox, Family StudiesThe Left Is Conditioning College Students To Hate Free Speech – John Daniel Davidson, The FederalistCampus Madness: Amid Uproar, Princeton's Class on Free Speech Issues Has Been Canceled – Guy Benson, TownhallMarriageThe Profound Spiritual Truth of Marriage – Dorothy Greco, RelevantHow To Prepare For Marriage And Make It Good Once You Get There – Melissa Langsam Braunstein, The FederalistShe Was Repulsed by Her Husband – Lisa Lakey, Family LifeJordan Peterson’s Radical Take on Marriage – Ashley McGuire, Family StudiesThe Eschatological Hope of Bearing Children – Ian Caveny, First ThingsThe Lost Decade – Mary May Larmoyeux, Family LifeThe Long-Term Benefits of Marriage: Evidence from the UK – Harry Benson, Family StudiesNo Matter How Anyone Tries To Glam It Up Or Brush It Off, Divorce Is Never ‘Over Easy’ – The FederalistWe Lost Our Baby, but We Didn't Want to Lose Our Marriage – Tanisha Garnier, Christianity TodayHow to Restore a Marriage Norm – Lawrence M. Mead, Family StudiesRankin finally pulls the plug on gay marriage – Jonathan Bell, The Royal GazetteFaith/Character/CultureRaising Gentlemen in a #MeToo World: Advice for Fathers – Patrick Fagan, Family StudiesWhy ‘Progressives’ Cannot Abide Dissent – Trevin Wax, The Gospel CoalitionThe Burdensome Myth of Romantic Love – David C. Dollahite and Betsy VanDenBerghe, First ThingsIs Life Ultimately Pointless? – Matt Nelson, Word On FireHuman SexualityIs America Running Out of Patience with LGBT Activism? – Glenn Stanton, Public DiscourseNine Decades of Promiscuity – Nicholas H. Wolfinger, Family StudiesWalgreens now allows bathroom use corresponding with gender identity – Rebecca Savransky, The HillStaggering Statistic Reveals How Many High Schoolers Now Identify as Transgender – Jason Hopkins, The Western JournalFive Paradoxes of the Sexual Revolution, Part I – Mary Eberstadt, The Catholic Thing‘Dirty Dozen’ List Sheds Light on Sexualized Corporate Culture – CBN NewsHuman Trafficking510 Arrested in Sex Trafficking Sting; 56 Victims Rescued – Donald Kaufman, truthdigPornographyLet’s Ban Porn – Ross Douthat, The New York TimesAmmunition for the Fight Against Porn – Dieudonné Tamfu, Desiring God5 Ways Intimacy Will Suffer if You Watch Porn Together – Mary Rose Somarriba, VerilyHow One Family Is Taking A Stand Against Pornography and Sexual Exploitation in America’s Schools – Robin Paterson, National Center on Sexual Exploitation
On January 25, 2018, the New York Times ran an op-ed by Sam Brinton under the headline, “Tortured in Gay Conversion Therapy.” (The online version posted January 24 read, “I Was Tortured in Gay Conversion Therapy. And It’s Still Legal in 41 States.”) Brinton frequently speaks and testifies in favor of laws to prohibit licensed therapists from engaging in sexual orientation change efforts (which opponents refer to as “conversion therapy”) with minors. (FRC’s defense of the right to choose such therapy can be found here).Brinton gives a shocking, first-person account. It includes this:The therapist ordered me bound to a table to have ice, heat and electricity applied to my body. I was forced to watch clips on a television of gay men holding hands, hugging and having sex. I was supposed to associate those images with the pain I was feeling to once and for all turn into a straight boy.I have just one question for the New York Times. Did you make any effort to fact-check Brinton’s claims?This is an opinion piece, you might respond. Since it reflects the writer’s opinion, it does not require fact-checking the way a news story does—does it?The truth is, newspapers fact-check opinion pieces all the time. Various publications and websites routinely ask for links or other documentation for factual claims made in an opinion piece.Brinton’s piece, though, was a first-person account of his own experience. How can you “fact-check” someone’s personal life experience?One way might be by checking it against previous accounts that Brinton himself has given of his own story. He has, after all, been sharing these allegations in the public square since 2010. If there are inconsistencies in the way he has described his own experience on different occasions, it might at least raise some doubts about the credibility of the overall account.Brinton’s Story UnverifiedI first wrote about Brinton’s story three and a half years ago on the FRC Blog, in an August 2014 piece titled, “Truth Matters in Ex-Gay Debate.” Part of what follows is an edited version of what I wrote then, with added comments at the end.Brinton’s story was apparently first captured, when he was a student at Kansas State, in a video interview by Nathan Manske of the “I’m from Driftwood” project, which seeks to create an “archive of stories” on “what it’s like to be LGBTQ throughout the world.” Brinton’s story was captured on video in 2010, but received a burst of attention in October of 2011, when Manske shared it in the Huffington Post. Although the Huffington Post article remains online, a passage I quoted in 2014 does not (the web page says it was “updated” December 6, 2017). However, a detailed recounting of Brinton’s story (along with an edited version of the original video) remains online at the website of The New Civil Rights Movement. That account includes these details:“Physical therapy was my hands being tied down and blocks of ice being placed on my hands. Then pictures of men holding hands would be shown to be so that way I would associate the concept of the pain of the ice with a man touching me.”“Then we went into heat. Coils would be wrapped around my hands and you would be able to turn the heat on or off. So now if we had a picture of a guy and a girl hugging, there was no pain. If we had a picture of a guy and a guy hugging, we had physical pain.”“We then went into the ‘Month of Hell,’” Brinton explains in the video below. “The ‘Month of Hell’ consisted of tiny needles being stuck into my fingers and then pictures of explicit acts between men would be shown and I’d be electrocuted.”This report was so shocking that even some pro-“gay” media tried to verify this report—but couldn’t.One of the inconsistencies pointed out by commenters on this article (on a gay website) was that “Brinton’s Facebook page ‘has a picture of the entire happy family at his college graduation ceremony, May 31, 2011’”—despite the fact that Brinton said on the video that “my dad has held a gun up to my head multiple times” and warned Brinton that “he would shoot me if I ever tried to walk in the door again.” (Brinton responded in the comments section that “my parents did come to my graduation since I am the very first person to graduate from college in my family. I am working on building a relationship to them . . . I was shocked they were there but so happy to see the love starting to rebuild.”)The Mystery TherapistMore importantly, Brinton, had not (in 2011) and (as far as I know) still has not, identified the counselor who allegedly engaged in these horrific practices—not by name, not by address, not even by city and state where they occurred (more on that later).Such omissions made even Wayne Besen, a prominent “anti-ex-gay” activist, reluctant to use Brinton’s story without further verification. Here’s the full statement Besen posted in the comments section of the Queerty article which questioned Brinton’s story.[emphasis added] Wayne BesenSamuel came forward and told a story presumably in an effort to help others. There are groups like mine who would be thrilled to use his example to demonstrate the harm caused by “ex-gay” therapy. We live for real life examples like this.However, until he provides more information to verify his experience, he makes it impossible for us to use him as an example. Indeed, it would be grossly irresponsible for us to do so.If a group like mine puts out or promotes a story that turns out to be exaggerated or fake, the religious right would rake us through the coals and by extension the entire LGBT community. This would cast an ominous shadow on all of the legitimate ex-ex-gay testimonies that have helped so many people come out of the closet.So, for the sake of the movement he is trying to help — it is critical that Sam reveal exactly who the therapist was that tortured him. He could do this publicly or privately, but we need more information before we can use his narrative.We very much hope he will provide enough information so we can help people by sharing his compelling story.Sincerely,Wayne BesenTruth Wins OutOct 11, 2011 at 8:51 pmHere is part of Brinton’s reply to Besen:I was indirectly in contact with Wayne and although I know he wants me to send the information of the therapist that is simply not an option. Counselor after counselor has seen me revert to near suicidal tendencies when I try to dig deep into the memories of that time and I simply don’t have his name. I can picture him clear as day in my nightmares but his name is not there. The movement can’t use me I guess.I have no problem with people not believing my story. It is not for me to try to prove. I don’t want to be the poster-child of the anti-conversion therapy movement since graduate school at MIT is plenty tough as it is.. . .Oct 14, 2011 at 2:11 amMemory and ForgettingNote that Brinton says of his therapist, “I can picture him clear as day in my nightmares”—but, as far as I know, he has also never provided a physical description of this individual.The entire subject of whether childhood trauma can result in repressed memories (as Brinton apparently asserts) is a controversial one. See, for example, the American Psychological Association’s Q&A on the topic here. It states:Many clinicians who work with trauma victims believe that this dissociation is a person's way of sheltering himself or herself from the pain of the memory. Many researchers argue, however, that there is little or no empirical support for such a theory.Even if the former theory is accepted, in Brinton’s case his amnesia is hardly “sheltering [him] from the pain of the memory.” It seems illogical that Brinton would be able to remember—and repeatedly recount in detail before cameras, in paid speaking engagements, and at legislative hearings—the excruciating details of the “torture” he claims he experienced, while repressing (to the point of becoming “near suicidal” at efforts to retrieve them) only the memories of the details—such as name or city—which might allow some verification of his account.Other Discrepancies in Brinton’s StoryDefenders of the right of people with same-sex attractions to pursue therapy aimed at reducing those attractions last year posted a YouTube video highlighting other problems with the story Brinton has told. For example, in one videotaped speech Brinton said that his therapy was provided by “a doctor.” Yet in one of the first written accounts of his story, from August of 2011, it says his therapy came at the hands of “the session leader¿who Sam specifies was a ‘religious therapist’ and not a doctor.” In yet another video—apparently of Brinton testifying in support of a legislative therapy ban—he says specifically that he was treated by “a licensed psychotherapist.” Note that legislative bans on “sexual orientation change efforts” or “conversion therapy” (a term never actually used by its practitioners) apply only to licensed professionals, not to “religious” counselors.Even the state in which Brinton underwent his alleged therapy is unclear. In the 2010 “Driftwood” video, Brinton says he grew up in Perry, Iowa. When the video was re-posted at the Huffington Post in October 2011, the article repeated that “Sam was raised in rural Iowa.” However, the Bay Windows account from August 2011 (reposted at LGBTQ Nation) said that Brinton “endured years of reparative therapy designed to ‘cure’ him of his homosexuality while living in Kansas.” Only two paragraphs later, however, it says, “Sam was a pre-teen, living with his parents in a conservative religious mission in Florida,” when his ordeal began. In his New York Times op-ed, he says it all happened “when I was a middle schooler in Florida.” So which was it—Iowa, Kansas, or Florida?Has Brinton Changed?There is one more discrepancy. In his Times op-ed, Brinton says his “conversion therapy” was “a trauma that was meant to erase my existence as a newly out bisexual.” This is the first time I have heard Brinton refer to himself as “bisexual.” The August 2011 Bay Windows article begins with the sentence, “Samuel Brinton is not afraid to say he’s gay.”Ironically, if Brinton went from identifying as gay in 2011 to identifying as “bisexual and gender fluid” in 2018, maybe he himself is proof that change is possible after all.
Today's category: CrimeStupid Criminals 3 Portsmouth, RI: Police charged Gregory Rosa, 25, with a string of vending machine robberies in January when he: 1. fled from police inexplicably when they spotted him loitering around a vending machine and 2. later tried to post his $400 bail in coins. Lake City, Florida: Karen Lee Joachimi, 20, was arrested for robbery of a Howard Johnson's motel. She was armed with only an electric chainsaw, which was not plugged in. Ann Arbor News (crime column): A man walked into Burger King in Ypsilanti, Michigan at 7:50 am, flashed a gun and demanded cash. The clerk turned him down because he said he couldn't open the cash register without a food order. When the man ordered onion rings, the clerk said they weren't available for breakfast. The man, frustrated, walked away. Bowling Green, Ohio, student Robert Ricketts, 19, had his head bloodied when he was struck by a Conrail train. He told police he was trying to see how close to the moving train he could place his head without getting hit. In Wesley Chapel, Florida, Joseph Aaron, 20, was hit in the leg with pieces of the bullet he fired at the exhaust pipe of his car. When repairing the car, he needed to bore a hole in the pipe. When he couldn't find a drill, he tried to shoot a hole in it. South Carolina: A man walked into a local police station, dropped a bag of cocaine on the counter, informed the desk sergeant that it was substandard cut, and asked that the person who sold it to him be arrested immediately. Indiana: A man walked up to a cashier at a grocery store and demanded all the money in the register. When the cashier handed him the loot, he fled--leaving his wallet on the counter. England: A German "tourist," supposedly on a golf holiday, shows up at customs with his golf bag. While making idle chatter about golf, the customs official realizes that the tourist does not know what a "handicap" is. The customs official asks the tourist to demonstrate his swing, which he does--backward! A substantial amount of narcotics was found in the golf bag. (Location Unknown): A man walked into a Circle-K (a convenience store similar to a 7-11), put a $20 bill on the counter and asked for change. When the clerk opened the cash drawer, the man pulled a gun and asked for all the cash in the register, which the clerk promptly provided. The man took the cash from the clerk and fled-- leaving the $20 bill on the counter. The total amount of cash he got from the drawer? Fifteen dollars. Texas: A man convicted of robbery worked out a deal to pay $9600 in damages rather than serve a prison sentence. For payment, he provided the court a check--a *forged* check. He got 10 years. (Location Unknown): A man went into a drug store, pulled a gun, announced a robbery, and pulled a Hefty-bag face mask over his head--and realized that he'd forgotten to cut eyeholes in the mask.View hundreds more jokes online.Email this joke to a friend
Guest Post by Steve Hays1. Two recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida renewed perennial debates about the problem of natural evil. Calvinists and freewill theists give different answers. A friend asked me to comment on this old screed by Rachel Held Evans: I rarely read RHE. Outrage is crack cocaine for folks like RHE. The moral satisfaction of waxing judgmental gives them a temporary high. They're addicted to indignation. They live for indignation. Because the high wears off, they are constantly on the lookout for something wax indignant about. In her post, RHE uses John Piper as a foil to attack Calvinism in general. She also uses the occasion as a pretext to launch into a gratuitous tirade against C. J. Mahaney. I say gratuitous because that has nothing to do with natural evil. In this post I'm not going to comment on the allegations against Mahaney, both because it's a red herring in relation to the primary topic of her post, and simply because I'm in no position to offer an informed opinion regarding his complicity, if any, in the scandal.
A judge in Florida ruled Monday that the state's updated 'stand your ground' law, which required prosecutors to disprove a defendant's self-defense case at pretrial hearings, is unconstitutional, setting up a showdown that could make its way to the state's top court.
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