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What the Bible Says, Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
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Contributor Christianity | Pastor Carlos Serrano New to Bible Baptist Church? If ever you're in the San Diego Area, we would love to have you join us. To find out more, click here: http://biblebaptistsd.org/visit/ ...
Cultivating A Christ Centered Christianity - Bro. Charlie Russell Message by Bro. Charlie Russell Text: Colossians 3 July 11, 2021 - 11AM Calvary Baptist Church 7321 Manchester Road Dundalk, Maryland 21222 Tel: ...
Liberty Baptist Church of Fircrest LiveStream True Biblical Christianity John 15:1-14 Speaker: Bro Mike Richter Time: 10:00 AM Service: Sunday School Date: June 13, 2021 if you have any issues or if you ...
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Whether we seek championship banners or church growth, we're all in danger of using the end to justify the means.In 2006, Mark Driscoll met with a group of Seattle pastors who were worried about Mars Hill’s public witness. Mark had risen to prominence with pugilistic bravado, and local leaders expressed concern that his tone and language about women and, in this particular instance, pastors’ wives hurt the perception of the church in their largely unchurched city. Despite their best efforts to connect on common ground, the meeting’s leaders counted the event a failure. Remarkable success had isolated Mark from the average person on whom his words fell. His institution had insulated him from critique. The meeting revealed clearly that power protected Mark from accountability.Your pastor doesn’t need outsized fame and acclaim to fall prey to the seduction of power, and neither do you. In this episode of The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill, host Mike Cosper looks to the world of sports to illustrate how power corrupts and how, when we abdicate our roles as gatekeepers for one another, absolute power corrupts absolutely. Step onto the basketball courts at Indiana University and behind the pulpit at Mars Hill to see how power becomes a strong drug that justifies abuse, keeps truth from speaking, and distances us from our shared humanity.“The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill” is a production of Christianity Today Executive Producer: Erik PetrikProduced, written, edited, and hosted by: Mike CosperAdditional editing by Resonate Recordings and Matt LinderAssociate produced by Joy Beth Smith Music, sound design, and mixing: Kate SiefkerTheme song: “Sticks and Stones” by King’s KaleidescopeClosing song: “Anger” by Treva BlomquistGraphic Design: Bryan ToddSocial Media: Nicole ShanksEditorial ...Continue reading...
“This Present Darkness” and other bestsellers show us the history of evangelicalism—and how it could be different.Danyell didn’t like This Present Darkness. In fact, she hated it.The 1986 novel by Frank Peretti tells the story of demons invading a classic American small town until the local Christians are roused to prayer. The book was wildly popular when it came out, and after more than 30 years, it still sells about 8,000 new copies annually. There are a lot of readers who really love This Present Darkness.For some, it’s changed the way they pray. It has shaped their understanding of how they should live out their faith in their daily lives.For others, they’ve long forgotten the plot but can still recall with delight the way Peretti describes the demons in vivid, visceral terms: slimy and slippery, horned and heaving, creeping, crackly, and carbuncled.But not Danyell. She didn’t like any part of the novel, even a little bit.Danyell read This Present Darkness in 2008 and, on the book-centric social site Goodreads, she wrote an exquisitely scathing, single-sentence review: “I found this book on the train in Ft. Lauderdale and honestly considered throwing myself on the tracks.”I don’t know if Mark Noll, the eminent evangelical historian, ever rode a Fort Lauderdale train, but he also had a strong negative reaction to This Present Darkness. In his classic 1994 study, The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind, he holds up Peretti’s novel as an example of what he doesn’t like about contemporary American Christianity. It is evidence of the scandal of the evangelical mind—which is that there is no evangelical mind.Jesus-loving, Bible-reading, born-again Christians have abandoned complexity and nuance and depth, Noll says, and embraced cheap, mass-market fiction.I’ve heard a lot of ...Continue reading...
Ahead of a UN climate summit, Catholic, Orthodox, and Anglican leaders jointly promote a “Season of Creation.”In their first joint statement ever, the spiritual leaders of Christianity’s three largest denominations addressed the United Nations.“Listen to the cry of the earth, pledging meaningful sacrifices,” stated their appeal. “We must decide what kind of world we want to leave to future generations.”Pope Francis of the Roman Catholic Church; Bartholomew I, ecumenical patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox Church; and Justin Welby, the evangelical Anglican archbishop of Canterbury, issued their plea this month to delegates attending next month’s UN climate summit in Scotland.Noting that life on “the earth which God has given” has become an “urgent matter of survival,” the three leaders framed inaction as a severe injustice.“The people bearing the most catastrophic consequences of these abuses are the poorest on the planet,” they stated, “and have been the least responsible for causing them.”The Lausanne/World Evangelical Alliance Creation Care Network (LWCCN) “wholeheartedly endorsed” the statement.“The environmental crisis represents the greatest challenge humanity has ever faced,” said Ed Brown, LWCCN co-catalyst for creation care, “and is a monumental failure to obey the clear command of Scripture to care for God’s creation.”Francis, Bartholomew, and Welby urged corporations to seek “people-centered profits.” They called on nations to “stop competing for resources, and start collaborating.”But they also called on Christians to pray, celebrating this “Season of Creation.”In 1989, then Ecumenical Patriarch Dimitrios I declared September 1 as a day of prayer for creation. ...Continue reading...
Prayer empowered them to live their faith with great courage. Their spiritual habits can breathe new life into our own.Christian women throughout the centuries serve as a cloud of witnesses for us, and their stories of faith still speak to us today. These eight women exemplified goodness, truth, and beauty in the midst of struggles, questions, and suffering—and they found strength to do so through prayer. Their prayer practices can breathe new life and meaning into our own.Vibia Perpetua: Courageous LovePerpetua (c.182–203) grew up in a Roman family in Carthage when Tunisia was under Roman rule. Changing her faith from the Roman imperial cult to Christianity was illegal. Nonetheless, at the time of her arrest, Perpetua was a committed catechumen—a young believer undergoing training in the faith prior to baptism. As part of her formal instruction of Christian teachings, she likely would have read contemporary North African theologian Tertullian’s On Prayer, which emphasized placing hope in God. After several days of house arrest with her companions, Perpetua was baptized. She and her fellow catechumens were soon taken to prison. The Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity, one of the oldest Christian texts, describes how Perpetua and her fellow prisoner Felicity “poured out their prayer to the Lord” in the days preceding their execution. At age 22, Perpetua died as a martyr, being tossed by a wild bull and killed by the sword in an arena with many spectators watching. The Passion documents Perpetua calling out at the moment of death, “Stand fast in the faith, and love you all one another.” For centuries, Christian communities in Carthage read her writing annually and were encouraged by her sacrificial love.For Perpetua, prayer was an act of courageous love—a way of loving others as a mother ...Continue reading...
Ahead of a UN climate summit, Catholic, Orthodox, and Anglican leaders jointly promote a “Season of Creation.”In their first joint statement ever, the spiritual leaders of Christianity’s three largest denominations addressed the United Nations.“Listen to the cry of the earth, pledging meaningful sacrifices,” stated their appeal. “We must decide what kind of world we want to leave to future generations.”Pope Francis of the Roman Catholic Church; Bartholomew I, ecumenical patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox Church; and Justin Welby, the evangelical Anglican archbishop of Canterbury, issued their plea this month to delegates attending next month’s UN climate summit in Scotland.Noting that life on “the earth which God has given” has become an “urgent matter of survival,” the three leaders framed inaction as a severe injustice.“The people bearing the most catastrophic consequences of these abuses are the poorest on the planet,” they stated, “and have been the least responsible for causing them.”The Lausanne/World Evangelical Alliance Creation Care Network (LWCCN) “wholeheartedly endorsed” the statement.“The environmental crisis represents the greatest challenge humanity has ever faced,” said Ed Brown, LWCCN co-catalyst for creation care, “and is a monumental failure to obey the clear command of Scripture to care for God’s creation.”Francis, Bartholomew, and Welby urged corporations to seek “people-centered profits.” They called on nations to “stop competing for resources, and start collaborating.”But they also called on Christians to pray, celebrating this “Season of Creation.”In 1989, then Ecumenical Patriarch Dimitrios I declared September 1 as a day of prayer for creation. ...Continue reading...
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