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The Ancient Baptist Journal is a quarterly publication established for the sole purpose of promoting Baptist principles and biblical preaching. Each glue-bound ...
Preaching Christ By All Means Everywhere
Independent Fundamental Baptist Preaching by Dr Jack Hyles and Dr Jeff Owens. MP3 Podcast iTunes search by title date service preacher and scripture references.
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Articles

What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
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C.I.B.C. - PREACHING - 26 April 2017 Wednesday Night - Pastor Hoose PLEASE SUBSCRIBE! Enjoy this video of some great bible preaching during one of our services. If you want to find out more about our church please visit our ...
Roll Call of the Very First Baptist Church - Dr. Andy Tully Title: Roll Call of the Very First Baptist Church Preacher: Dr. Andy Tully -Video Upload powered by https://www.TunesToTube.com.
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Denominations that support and enhance the biblical mission of the local church will thrive. Those that don't will continue to decline.There are only two forms of the church that ultimately matter.The universal church and the local church.Everything else is an add-on. Including buildings, furniture, styles of music, types of preaching, curriculum, and the subject of today’s article, denominations.I’m not against denominations. I’ve been in one my whole life and it’s been a blessing to our church and to me personally.But, like church buildings, pews, choir robes or skinny jeans on the worship leader, it’s a temporary condition that has a limited life-span.As I’ve traveled around the world over the last several years, I’ve ministered in churches of almost every denomination and non-denomination. By doing so, I’ve learned a lot about the state of denominations today.Here are 14 of my observations:1. We are in a post-denominational culture.It’s not coming. It’s here.Like hymnbooks and pews bolted to the floor, there are still a lot of denominations around, but they’re becoming less common, especially among younger, newer churches.Also like the changes from pews and hymnbooks to portable seats and video screens, this is not all good or all bad.Whether we like it or not, the Baby Boomers are likely to be the last generation that will care, commit to, or fight over denominational labels. (More on that in point 12.)2. Denominations are still extremely helpful, especially for small churches.Big churches have the size, the money and the infrastructure to operate independently far more easily than small churches.Plus, as I’ve pointed out in Small Church Essentials, bigger churches have a lot more in common with each other than small churches do, so they have a greater ability to lean on each other ...Continue reading...
Denominations that support and enhance the biblical mission of the local church will thrive. Those that don't will continue to decline.There are only two forms of the church that ultimately matter.The universal church and the local church.Everything else is an add-on. Including buildings, furniture, styles of music, types of preaching, curriculum, and the subject of today’s article, denominations.I’m not against denominations. I’ve been in one my whole life and it’s been a blessing to our church and to me personally.But, like church buildings, pews, choir robes or skinny jeans on the worship leader, it’s a temporary condition that has a limited life-span.As I’ve traveled around the world over the last several years, I’ve ministered in churches of almost every denomination and non-denomination. By doing so, I’ve learned a lot about the state of denominations today.Here are 14 of my observations:1. We are in a post-denominational culture.It’s not coming. It’s here.Like hymnbooks and pews bolted to the floor, there are still a lot of denominations around, but they’re becoming less common, especially among younger, newer churches.Also like the changes from pews and hymnbooks to portable seats and video screens, this is not all good or all bad.Whether we like it or not, the Baby Boomers are likely to be the last generation that will care, commit to, or fight over denominational labels. (More on that in point 12.)2. Denominations are still extremely helpful, especially for small churches.Big churches have the size, the money and the infrastructure to operate independently far more easily than small churches.Plus, as I’ve pointed out in Small Church Essentials, bigger churches have a lot more in common with each other than small churches do, so they have a greater ability to lean on each other ...Continue reading...
One of the first books I read in full-time ministry was In Search of Excellence by Tom Peters. Although it is specifically about excellence in business, I was captivated by the realization that if the secular world would care about excellence in the workplace, how much more should we care about excellence in ministry? I have been on a pursuit ever since to have a ministry that honors God.Of course, it's easy to say, “We care about excellence.” But do we actually practice excellence? Do we strive for it?Here are seven ways we work to strive for excellence in ministry:1. A biblical purpose—If our purpose is anything less than to glorify God, we may end up with excellent features, but we will be diminishing our effectiveness in leading people to Jesus. We need His power and to lift Him up more than anything else.2. Internal reviews—Every staff member is reviewed annually according to their written job description. This is a time to give input, receive feedback, and for both the staff member and their team leader to assess their productivity and growth over the past year as well as to address any road blocks or needs for more effective ministry.3. Post-event reviews—After an event—whether it be Missions Conference or a special community outreach or college registration week—we plan a debrief time to assess how it went, what we should be sure to repeat, and how we can make it better in the future.4. External audits—Every year, we hire an outside firm to provide a financial audit of our entire ministry. A couple years ago, we asked Best Christian Workplaces to assess our day-to-day office environment and procedures.In recent years, we've pursued Christian accreditation for both our Christian school and West Coast Baptist College. Although growing up, I was told that accreditation equaled government control of the church, we've since been able to find that there are actually Christian accreditation agencies that are approved by the Department of Education. We've discovered that neither these agencies nor the DOE have control over what we do. While they provide assessment and peer review, they have not given mandates regarding our curriculum or doctrine. Should that day come (and it may), we can and will pull out of the voluntary accreditation. Meanwhile, we're thankful for the high academic standards, strategic planning, and external peer review of other school and college administrators coming to visit periodically and helping us maintain best practices.5. Internal questionnaires—From time to time, we ask our church family, Christian school parents, Bible college students, or other groups within our ministry how we're doing in specific areas. Being open to feedback is one of the best ways to see areas that need attention or growth.6. Consistent staff training—Weekly staff meetings with a lesson or ministry training and annual staff orientation are two great ways to invest in the ongoing development of staff. Additionally, our pastoral staff often reads a book together and discusses what we're learning at our weekly meetings.7. Conferences and personal growth resources—Ministry conferences provide Bible preaching, outside perspective and ideas, and sharpening fellowship. They also provide specific training on needed topics. For instance, at Spiritual Leadership Conference this year, we'll have topics on planning and guiding a church budget, mandatory legal reporting, the role of worship in discipleship, developing your own faith, personal time management, and several dozen more. I'm preparing a session on creating a dashboard for monitoring key indicators of a church's health. Whether it is through this conference or an online Bible class or some other resource, investing in personal growth helps grow your capacity for ministry excellence.Remember, we serve a God who is worthy of our very best. And we serve His church, which Jesus valued so much He paid for it with His own blood.Surely, our Lord and His church deserve our pursuit of excellence.
Alumni are a special part of ABC's celebration of 30 years of training God's servants for God's service! On April 29th and 30th, alumni will be preaching in chapel to help us close out the 2018-19 school year. If you are in the area, please plan on joining us for at least one of these…Continue reading "2019 ALUMNI DAYS"The post 2019 ALUMNI DAYS appeared first on Ambassador Baptist College.
Church growth is a mystery. Church failure is predictable. Church health is what really matters.Everyone wants the sure thing.If we just learn the right principles, follow the latest How To Grow Your Church list, or (my favorite) “do it like the early church”, then Boom! Our church is guaranteed numerical success.I wish.Here’s the reality behind church growth.You can predict church failure. Do enough of the wrong things (or not enough of the right things) and almost anyone can predict that a church body is doomed.But you can’t predict church growth.You can remove the obstacles to growth. You can put in systems that will help you be ready for growth. You can pray for growth, work for growth, preach about growth, evangelize for growth…But none of that makes numerical church growth guaranteed or predictable.Why There Are No Growth GuaranteesHow can I be so sure? Because there are so many great pastors and congregations that followed all the right steps but didn’t see the promised results. And there are other congregations that have made a ton of mistakes, but experienced rapid growth.One church says “we followed the latest research, changed what needed to be changed, upgraded our music, our facility, our discipleship program, and that’s why we grew.” Another church says “all we did was preach the Word, and that’s why we grew.”Meanwhile a third church says “we followed the latest research, changed what needed to be changed, upgraded our music, our facility, our discipleship program, but didn’t grow at all.” While the church down the street says “we’re just staying faithful and preaching the Word, but we’re not growing either.”What you won’t ever hear is “we argue a lot over music, it takes forever ...Continue reading...
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