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BR Lakin - Are You Ready To Meet God? (Pt. 1 of 4) Bascom Ray (BR) Lakin (January 5, 1901- March 15, 1984) was a Baptist preacher and evangelist. BR Lakin was born on a farm near Fort Gay, West Virginia, on the Kentucky border. His mother had prayed for a "preacher man" and had dedicated him to God
B. R. Lakin - Are You Ready To Meet God? (Pt. 4 of 4) Bascom Ray (B. R.) Lakin (January 5, 1901- March 15, 1984) was a Baptist preacher and evangelist. B. R. Lakin was born on a farm near Fort Gay, West Virginia...
B. R. Lakin - Are You Ready To Meet God? (Pt. 2 of 4) Bascom Ray (B. R.) Lakin (January 5, 1901- March 15, 1984) was a Baptist preacher and evangelist. B. R. Lakin was born on a farm near Fort Gay, West Virginia...
B. R. Lakin - Are You Ready To Meet God? (Pt. 3 of 4) Bascom Ray (B. R.) Lakin (January 5, 1901- March 15, 1984) was a Baptist preacher and evangelist. B. R. Lakin was born on a farm near Fort Gay, West Virginia...
BR Lakin - Does Jesus Care? (Pt. 1 of 4) Bascom Ray (BR) Lakin (January 5, 1901- March 15, 1984) was a Baptist preacher and evangelist. BR Lakin was born on a farm near Fort Gay, West Virginia, on the Kentucky border. His mother had prayed for a "preacher man" and had dedicated him to God
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The Church SteepleThe Rev. John Alderson, Jr., founder of the Old Greenbrier Baptist Church, Alderson, was born in New Jersey on March 5, 1738.  His father, the Rev. John Alderson, Sr., who came New Jersey in 1719, and his grandfather, the Rev. John Alderson of Yorkshire, England, were distinguished ministers of the gospel, the latter of the Established church.  the former, born in England in 1699, came to America in 1719, settled in New Jersey, married Jane Curtis, became a Baptist minister, served Bethlehem Church, New Jersey, and later located in Germantown, PA.In 1755, he moved to Rockingham County, Virginia, where he had the pastoral care of Lynville's Creek Church.  While there, the call came to his son, John Jr., to enter the ministry.  In 1775 John took charge of the Lynville Creek Baptist Church upon the removal of his father to Botetourt County.However, in 1774 and again in 1776 Rev. John Alderson, Jr. made two missionary tours across the Alleghenies into the Valley of Greenbrier.Impressed by the need for a constant missionary effort on behalf of the settlers there, he determined to make that region his home, and in 1774 he went with his family to live and teach the gospel of Christ west of the mountains.  It is said he was eighteen months making the journey across themountains, coming in the first wagon to make such a journey.On reaching Jackson's River, he learned that the Indians had attacked the home of Col. James Graham in Greenbrier, killing one member of his family and taking another prisoner.  Consequently, he delayed there several months, reaching his destination in October.The Indian depredations continues for a number of years.  The inhabitants, for their mutual protection, mostly resided in forts.  So, protected by an armed escort through the woods, from one fort to another, this zealous minister traveled in pursuit of his dangerous vocation.M. Alderson organized the Old Greenbrier Baptist Church, North Alderson, on November 24, 1787, with twelve members, including himself, his wife, and his brother, Thomas, a Revolutionary soldier who had just returned from his battle of Yorktown which had occurred thirty-six days earlier.In 1784, the congregation built a log church on a lot given by William Morris, a brother in law of Rev. John Alderson, Jr.  they having married the Carroll sisters, Nancy and Mary.  These sisters were distant relatives of Charles Carroll of Carrollton.The twelve members organized into the Greenbrier Church petitioned the Ketochton Association, from which Mr. Alderson had come, to receive them into its membership.  This was done.  But in 1796 they united with the New River Association, which had recently been formed with ten churches.  In 1800, Rev. John Alderson, Jr., with the aid of Rev. James Johnston and Rev.Josiah Osborne, the latter two having recently come into this section, petitioned and obtained leave to form a separate Greenbrier Association. The first meeting was held in Big Levels (Lewisburg) Church in 1801.Mr. Alderson founded nine churches, from Greenbrier to the Kentucky line, in about forty years.  He closed a long life, in the full confidence of his brethren, on March 5, 1821.  He was buried just a few feet back of the church.His contemporaries speak of him as "A man of much more than ordinary ability" and as "one of the leading men of his day."  Besides the trials incident to work upon the frontier, he had, like his father, the distinguished privilege of suffering in behalf of Christ for the promotion of religious liberty, having been imprisoned for preaching and performing marriages contrary to the laws of the Established Church of England.  Paul's list of perils might well be applicable to this "Apostle to the Greenbrier."He established a numerous family.  A number of his descendants have been zealous heralds of the cross in this and other states.  One or more members have gone into nearly every state in the union from this church.From the Greenbrier Church have come at least a score of churches, while through the instrumentality of agencies which he set in motion thousands of men and women have been led into the Kingdom of God.   The twelve original members of the Greenbrier Church have grown to 685, and the four original churches, in the Greenbrier Association, to fifty, with 6,354 members.  The fourth church building of handsome stone stands on the same spot where the first log building and the two successive frame buildings stood.  Many of his descendants are members of the church he founded even to the eighth generation.The twelve original members of the Greenbrier Church have grown to 685, and the four original churches to fifty with over 6,354 members.  The fourth church building is on the same spot where the first log building and its successors stood.In connection with the life of the Rev. John Alderson, Jr. some one has said the beautiful words inscribed upon Moody's tomb are strikingly appropriate: "The world passeth away, and the dust thereof; but he that doeth the will of God abideth forever."Dale R. Hart D.D.Pastor, Author, conference speaker, camp meeting preacher.
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Several state legislatures are considering stronger "born-alive" protections, after Family Research Council released a set of online, interactive maps last fall showing the status of pro-life laws in the states, including those that protect infants born alive after surviving botched abortions. West Virginia recently passed a bill into law that took the state from the category of "no protections" to "strong protections" on FRC's map, with all Republicans and 49 out of 55 Democrats in the West Virginia legislature voting for the bill. Currently, bills to strengthen protections for born-alive abortion survivors are pending in Kentucky, Ohio, and Wyoming. Yet, due to almost exclusively Democrat opposition, repeated attempts to pass legislation to protect born alive abortion survivors have failed in the U.S. House and Senate during this Congress....
In the midst of the current political divisions gripping our nation, it’s difficult to find close friendships between people with opposing viewpoints. It seems we are divided on every issue, with each side digging their heels in more and more and little hope of solving America’s greatest problems.In such times, many are asking if there is any hope of finding common ground. I have often found it difficult to form meaningful friendships with people whom I disagree with on fundamental issues like life, family, and religious freedom. But may I suggest that friendship is exactly what we need to bring us together? What if we could form genuine relationships with those on the other side to make our nation better together? Two of our most famous Founding Fathers had significant political differences that nearly ended their friendship. Yet they persevered, giving us the beautiful story of reconciliation that we have today.John Adams and Thomas Jefferson first met in Philadelphia at the Second Continental Congress of 1775. A year later, they worked together on the committee tasked with drafting the Declaration of Independence, whose 244th anniversary we celebrate this weekend. In the 1780s, Adams and Jefferson worked together on diplomatic assignments in England and France, managing to find some time for leisure during their demanding duties as ambassadors. Over the years, they became close friends, corresponding by letter often when they were separated.On politics, however, the two could not be more opposite and frequently debated their differences. In fact, their disagreements sometimes became personal and often tested their friendship. Adams, a devout member of the Federalist Party, favored a strong central government, a national bank, and close relations with Great Britain. On the other hand, Jefferson, an ardent Democrat-Republican, favored states’ rights, reduced government spending, greater relations with France, and westward expansion. Despite their passionate political differences, their close friendship continued for many years.However, circumstances changed in 1801. Adams was still president but had just lost his bid for reelection in a bitter battle against Jefferson. In the final hours of his presidency before Jefferson took office, Adams made a number of last-minute judicial and bureaucratic appointments—appointees who were loyal Federalists and would oppose the incoming administration, making it extremely difficult for Jefferson to govern effectively. In fact, Jefferson later wrote that they “were selected from among my most ardent political enemies.” This political disagreement proved to be the severest test of their friendship, and the two ceased correspondence for the next decade.After Jefferson retired from the presidency in 1809, Dr. Benjamin Rush took it upon himself to act as an arbiter and rekindle the friendship between Adams and Jefferson. However, it took two years until he was able to convince the two to resume their friendship. When one of Jefferson’s neighbors visited Adams in 1811, Adams is reported to have said: “I have always loved Jefferson, and still love him.” Upon hearing this report from his neighbor, Jefferson wrote Dr. Rush: “This is enough for me. I only needed this knowledge to revive towards him all the affections of the most cordial moments of our lives.” At Dr. Rush’s persuading, he convinced Adams to renew his correspondence with Jefferson. The two continued to write each other often until their deaths 15 years later.Reconciliation often makes broken relationships stronger than they were before, and so it did with Adams and Jefferson. In the years following their renewed friendship, a rich correspondence commenced between the two, reminiscing about the past, discussing current events, and looking forward to what lay ahead.On July 4, 1826, 50 years to the day after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson died at Monticello in the rolling hills of Virginia. A few hours later, John Adams passed at his home in Massachusetts. His family reported that the last dying words he spoke were “Thomas Jefferson lives,” not knowing that his dear friend had died hours earlier. In today’s polarizing political climate, it’s easy to see the “other side” as enemies, with the strong desire to convince those on the fence that our ideas are better. That is not to diminish our differences in worldviews. Without a doubt, liberals and conservatives both have two very different ideas for the future of America. But, on this July 4th, perhaps we can learn a lesson from two of our greatest Founding Fathers. They didn’t ignore their differences as if they didn’t exist, but they didn’t allow those differences to interfere with forming a lifelong friendship. Likewise, we don’t have to set aside our differences either because that won’t make them disappear. Being friendly isn’t abandoning your principles. Perhaps this July 4th can be different if we don’t let those differences get in the way of crossing the street and talking to our neighbor. After all, we are celebrating our nation’s independence and the freedom we have to be different.Furthermore, as Christians, there are several biblical commands that are easy to forget in the divisive times in which we live. First, we must remember that those with whom we disagree are not the enemy. Paul reminds us in Ephesians 6:12 (ESV) that “we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this age, against spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.” Second, Christians are commanded to love our enemies and pray for them (Matthew 5:44). Third, Scripture tells us to love our neighbors as ourselves, whether we agree with them or not (Matthew 22:39). Last, wherever God’s spirit is, there is freedom (2 Cor. 3:17). By embracing reconciliation with others, we not only encourage freedom but we also invite God’s spirit to dwell among us.We often quote the first sentence of the second paragraph in the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” But we miss the weight of its last sentence: “And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.” The signers of the Declaration no doubt had significant political differences and widely varying ideas for the future of the young nation. But they did not let those differences hinder them from forming friendships or from their ultimate goal—independence and freedom for all. These 56 men, firmly trusting in God, were willing to give up everything—their careers, possessions, and even their very lives—for the sake of freedom. Two of our future presidents—John Adams and Thomas Jefferson—both put aside their differences when they signed their names to that sacred document.What we need in America right now is a good dose of civility and genuine friendships. Sure, there is a time and place to discuss the future of our great republic—a discussion we will continue to have and fiercely debate. But, this weekend, maybe we can take a break from debating on social media, protesting, or grasping for the next news hit and simply focus on loving our neighbor.Let’s remember to celebrate our independence this weekend and the freedom it gives us to debate and be different. But let’s also not forget the opportunity we have to reach across the aisle and love our neighbor.
Today's category: CrimeStupid Criminals 2 Our Product of the Week Award goes to Japanese inventor Kenji Kawakami, creator of "Baby Mops." Kawakami has attached mops to baby clothing, so your infant can clean the floor as he crawls... plans for the "Baby-Vac" are still on the drawing board... An off-duty police officer in Newark, NJ, had a pistol-shaped cigarette lighter which he had been using all night while drinking at a local tavern. After many hours and drinks, he apparently mistook his 32 revolver for the lighter. When he went to light his cigarette, he shot and killed John Fazzola, who was seated 5 stools away at the bar... When asked to explain an increase in area robberies, Washington police chief John Layton replied, "The biggest factor is the inclination of certain individuals of acquiring funds by illegal means..." When Stan Caddell wanted to wash his Chevrolet, he backed the car into a foot of water in the Mississippi River at Hannibal, Missouri. When he got out to clean the car, it floated away. Police were able to retrieve the vehicle some distance downstream. According to an officer on the scene, no action would be taken against the driver because "you can't ticket a guy for being stupid..." The best-laid plans of a Canadian couple in a suicide pact went awry because the weapon they used nearly as old as they are. Harold Pinna, 89, and his 92-year-old wife decided to end it all with a .22 caliber pistol that hadn't been fired in 60 years. Mr. Pinna shot his wife in the head, but the rusty bullet ricocheted off a hair curler, and she suffered only a mild scalp laceration. He then put the gun to his right ear and fired again. The shot was so weak that the bullet lodged in his ear. The dazed couple then gave themselves up to the police... it was either that or throw themselves out the first floor window... Times of London: A thief who sneaked into a hospital was scarred for life when he tried to get a suntan. After evading security staff at Odstock Hospital in Salisbury, Wiltshire, and helping himself to doctor's paging devices, the thief spotted a vertical sunbed. He walked into the unit and removed his clothes for a 45-minute tan. However, the high-voltage UV machine at the hospital, which is renowned for its treatment of burns victims, has a maximum dosage of 10 seconds. After lying on the bed for almost 300 times the recommended maximum time, the man was covered in blisters. Hours later, when the pain of the burns became unbearable, he went to Southampton General Hospital, 20 miles away, in Hampshire. Staff became suspicious because he was wearing a doctor's coat. After tending his wounds they called the police. Southampton police said: "This man broke into Odstock and decided he fancied a quick suntan. Doctors say he is going to be scarred for life. San Antonio, Texas: 45 year-old Amy Brasher was arrested after a mechanic reported to police that 18 packages of marijuana were packed in the engine compartment of the car which she had brought to the mechanic for an oil change. According to police, Brasher later said that she didn't realize that the mechanic would have to raise the hood to change the oil. Arizona: A company called "Guns For Hire" stages gunfights for Western movies, etc. One day, they received a call from a 47-year-old woman, who wanted to have her husband killed. She got 4-1/2 years in jail. (Location Unknown): A man successfully broke into a bank after hours and stole--are you ready for this?--the bank's video camera. While it was recording. Remotely. (That is, the videotape recorder was located elsewhere in the bank, so he didn't get the videotape of himself stealing the camera.) (Location Unknown): A man successfully broke into a bank's basement through a street-level window, cutting himself up pretty badly in the process. He then realized that (1) he could not get to the money from where he was,(2) he could not climb back out the window through which he had entered, and (3) he was bleeding pretty badly. So he located a phone and dialed "911" for help ... Virginia: Two men in a pickup truck went to a new-home site to steal a refrigerator. Banging up walls, floors, etc., they snatched a refrigerator from one of the houses, and loaded it onto the pickup. The truck promptly got stuck in the mud, so these brain surgeons decided that the refrigerator was too heavy. Banging up *more* walls, floors, etc., they put the refrigerator BACK into the house, and returned to the pickup truck, only to realize that they locked the keys in the truck--so they abandoned it. Chicago: A man was wanted for throwing bricks through jewelry store windows and making off with the loot. He was arrested last night after throwing a brick into a plexiglass window...the brick bounced back, hit him in the head and knocked him cold until the police got there.View hundreds more jokes online.Email this joke to a friend
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