Home »

Search Result

Search Results for JUST

Links

The American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ) is committed to insuring the ongoing viability of constitutional freedoms.
Whether you're already familiar with God's Word, or just exploring what Christianity is all about we hope you'll visit the rest of our Web Ministry and that you will find yourself drawn deeper into a dynamic relationship with God through yo
Berlin Baptist Church, Marne Michigan Berlin Baptist Church is a family oriented, multi-generational church just west of Grand Rapids, Michigan. We exist to glorify God, share Jesus Christ, equip disciples, love and serve others.
Show all results in links

Blogs

Moved back on Cloudflare
Categories of Special Interest -You Should Pay Attention To
Show all results in blogs 

Articles

Msg #2238 Think On These Things What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Msg #2234 Fret Not 2022-24 What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Msg #2232 Cretian Slow Bellies What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Msg #2231 Prevailing Froward Mouths What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Msg #2229 Perilous Times, Beautiful Feet What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Show all results in articles 

Videos

"The Original Rejection by Man" | Pastor Tom Fry | September 18, 2022 | Morning Sermon www.ambassadorbaptistchurch.faithweb.com "The Just Shall Live by Faith" series continues with a close look at the second half of ...
Daily Devotions - Being a Help and a Blessing (Sept 11, 2022) Proverbs 28:8 He that by usury and unjust gain increaseth his substance, he shall gather it for him that will pity the poor.
But I'm Just a Kid  - Pastor Stacey Shiflett Message by Pastor Stacey Shiflett Text: Jer. 1:6 September 9, 2022 - 9AM Calvary Baptist Church 7321 Manchester Road ...
Just Keep Trusting Jesus Bro. Lance Hohenstreet.09-04-2022.PM.
Show all results in videos 

News

The successor to Paige Patterson cites “reputational, legal, and financial realities” as he moves on to an IMB role.Adam Greenway has resigned as president of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary three and a half years after he succeeded fired president Paige Patterson.Greenway stepped down during a trustee meeting on Thursday and will take a role at the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC)’s International Mission Board, according to a statement from the seminary.O. S. Hawkins, retired president of the SBC financial services entity GuideStone, will lead the school in the interim. (Update: On September 27, the trustees adjusted plans to have David Dockery—who was a theology professor and special consultant to Greenway—serve as interim president and Hawkins as senior advisor and ambassador-at-large. Dockery was previously president of Union University and Trinity International University/Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.) Greenway said in a statement: These days are incredibly challenging in the life of our denomination. They are also challenging times for academic institutions, particularly theological seminaries. In February 2019, Carla and I accepted the call to come back “home” to Southwestern Seminary with an understanding of these challenges, but also with the strong desire to be part of the solution. What we failed to appreciate was the enormity of the reputational, legal, and financial realities that would welcome us to the Dome—only to be compounded by a global pandemic unlike anything we have ever experienced before. We have done our best to serve Southern Baptists by helping position our seminary for the future, but much, much work remains to be done. Nevertheless, in the Providence of God we sense a release from our duties here.Since assuming the presidency at Southwestern, Greenway worked ...Continue reading...
Founder of Open Doors said he wasn't an “evangelical stuntman” but a faithful Christian following the leading of the Spirit.Anne van der Bijl, a Dutch evangelical known to Christians worldwide as Brother Andrew, the man who smuggled Bibles into closed Communist countries, has died at the age of 94.Van der Bijl became famous as “God’s smuggler” when the first-person account of his missionary adventures—slipping past border guards with Bibles hidden in his blue Volkswagen Beetle—was published in 1967. God’s Smuggler was written with evangelical journalists John and Elizabeth Sherrill and published under his code name “Brother Andrew.” It sold more than 10 million copies and was translated into 35 languages.The book inspired numerous other missionary smugglers, provided funding to van der Bilj’s ministry Open Doors, and drew evangelical attention to the plight of believers in countries where Christian belief and practice were illegal. Van der Bijl protested that people missed the point, however, when they held him up as heroic and extraordinary.“I am not an evangelical stuntman,” he said. “I am just an ordinary guy. What I did, anyone can do.”No one knows how many Bibles van der Bijl took into Poland, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, East Germany, Bulgaria, and other Soviet-bloc countries in the decade before the success of God’s Smuggler forced him into the role of figurehead and fundraiser for Open Doors. Estimates have ranged into the millions. A Dutch joke popular in the late 1960s said, “What will the Russians find if they arrive first at the moon? Brother Andrew with a load of Bibles.”Van der Bijl, for his part, did not keep track and did not think the exact number was important.“I don't care about statistics,” he said in a 2005 interview. ...Continue reading...
Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and Sikh clergy will advise government on funding and other solutions.The Department of Homeland Security has announced the appointment of a new, 25-member faith-based advisory council to assist Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas in finding ways to protect houses of worship.The council consists of Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh clergy plus some law enforcement and nonprofit faith group leaders.The safety of religious congregations has been a growing concern for a decade—since the shooting at the Oak Creek, Wisconsin, Sikh temple in 2012. It was followed by the massacre at Emanuel AME in Charleston, South Carolina, a mostly Black congregation, in 2015; the killing of nearly two dozen worshipers at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas; the killing of 11 Jews at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh in 2018.And those are only the most notable mass killings. Other acts of violence, include the 2017 and 2019 firebombings of mosques in Victoria, Texas and Escondido, California.The council is expected to help the department evaluate the effectiveness of existing security-related programs and improve coordination and sharing of threat and security-related information.The Federal Emergency Management Agency, an agency of the Department of Homeland Security, has a Nonprofit Security Grant Program that provides federal funds for nonprofits and houses of worship to beef up security on their premises.Funding for the program was increased to $250 million in 2022, up from $180 million in 2021. But not all houses of worship that apply get the grant. This year, just over half of the 3,470 applications received were approved, the Jewish Insider reported. Several religious groups are advocating for $360 million in funding in 2023.The advisory council’s mission will be broader than advocating ...Continue reading...
Twenty-four pastors and one imam lose argument that the rules designating worship “high risk” violated their religious rights. New Zealand’s High Court has ruled that government officials were not acting unlawfully when they restricted and regulated religious services during the COVID-19 pandemic. The court acknowledged that rules curtailed the protected right to “manifest religious beliefs” but deemed that allowable in a health emergency.Starting in December 2021, the New Zealand government limited religious gatherings to 100 vaccinated people or 25 unvaccinated people. Face masks were also required if the house of worship shared the site with any other groups. The government’s director-general of health, Ashley Bloomfield, deemed religious gatherings “high risk” because of the presence of elderly and immune-compromised people.Some religious leaders complained the restrictions were reminiscent of Nazi Germany, and one was briefly jailed for refusing to comply.Twenty-four Christian pastors and one Muslim imam sued Chris Hipkins, the minister for COVID-19 response, and Bloomfield, claiming the regulations violated their religious freedom. The New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (BORA) says that "every person has the right to manifest that person’s religion or belief in worship, observance, practice, or teaching, either individually or in community with others, and either in public or in private.”Justice Cheryl Gwyn ruled, however, that though the COVID-19 rules did restrict religious freedom, that was justified by the need to reduce the risk to public health during a pandemic. The right to manifest religious belief is protected, but not absolute. According to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, also signed by the United States, religious freedom can be limited in the interests ...Continue reading...
How fast does it take to fill a big magma chamber? Millions of years? No. Just a few months, actually.
Show all results in news 

FamilyNet Top Sites Top Independent Baptist Sites KJV-1611 Authorized Version Topsites Preaching Tools. Net Top 100 Websites Top Local New Testament Baptist Church Sites Cyberspace Ministry - Top Christian Sites

Powered by Ekklesia-Online

Locations of visitors to this page free counters