Home »

Search Result

Search Results for Black

Articles

Msg #2232 Cretian Slow Bellies What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Msg #2137 Don't Judaize Christianity What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Msg #2129 Villains in Persecution What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Msg #2125 The Lies of False Teachers What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Show all results in articles 

Videos

R. G. Lee - Jesus Above All (Pt. 3 of 3)

Pastor R.G. Lee was born November 11, 1886, and died July 20, 1978. The midwife attending his birth held baby Lee in her black arms while dancing a jig around the room, saying, "Praise God! The Lord has sent a preacher to this house." "God-sent preacher" well describes Dr. Lee. Few in number are the Baptists who have never heard his most famous sermon, "Payday Someday!" If you haven't heard it, or read it, surely you have heard some preacher make a favorable reference to it.

R. G. Lee - Jesus Above All (Pt. 2 of 3)

Pastor R.G. Lee was born November 11, 1886, and died July 20, 1978. The midwife attending his birth held baby Lee in her black arms while dancing a jig around the room, saying, "Praise God! The Lord has sent a preacher to this house." "God-sent preacher" well describes Dr. Lee. Few in number are the Baptists who have never heard his most famous sermon, "Payday Someday!" If you haven't heard it, or read it, surely you have heard some preacher make a favorable reference to it.

Pastor R. G. Lee - Payday Someday! (Pt. 4 of 4)

 

Pastor R.G. Lee was born November 11, 1886, and died July 20, 1978. The midwife attending his birth held baby Lee in her black arms while dancing a jig around the room, saying, "Praise God! The Lord has sent a preacher to this house." "God-sent preacher" well describes Dr. Lee. Few in number are the Baptists who have never heard his most famous sermon, "Payday Someday!" If you haven't heard it, or read it, surely you have heard some preacher make a favorable reference to it.

Pastor R. G. Lee - Payday Someday! (Pt. 3 of 4)

Pastor R.G. Lee was born November 11, 1886, and died July 20, 1978. The midwife attending his birth held baby Lee in her black arms while dancing a jig around the room, saying, "Praise God! The Lord has sent a preacher to this house." "God-sent preacher" well describes Dr. Lee. Few in number are the Baptists who have never heard his most famous sermon, "Payday Someday!" If you haven't heard it, or read it, surely you have heard some preacher make a favorable reference to it.


Show all results in videos 

News

When Christian investors focus solely on avoiding unethical causes, they miss a chance to build up good corporations and ministries.In 1971, the Episcopal Church ignited modern “values investing” when it challenged General Motors’ policies in apartheid South Africa. Holding a meager 0.004 percent of shares, the church introduced a board resolution (alongside Black pastor and GM board member Leon Sullivan) that sparked a movement and changed corporate America’s approach to apartheid.Those Christian activist investors were building on a long legacy of faith-aligned financial management, stretching from Jewish law to John Wesley’s admonitions against investing in alcohol and tobacco. But over the past 50 years, the church’s approach to values-aligned investing has stagnated even as the mainstream world has fully embraced the concept.In 2020, there was approximately $106 trillion in managed assets around the world, and at least $35 trillion of that was in “ESG” mandates—those with some explicit focus on environmental, social, or governance concerns. Most major investment and wealth managers now have clear ESG policies and capabilities with defined agendas, sometimes under alternative monikers like “responsible” or “ethical” investing or corporate social responsibility (CSR).Asset management firms like Blackrock, State Street, and Vanguard—which collectively own almost 20 percent of the S&P 500—regularly push companies to adopt environmental or social policies aligned with their agendas.The sovereign wealth funds of countries like New Zealand, Norway, China, and Saudi Arabia shape companies and policies all over the world. And huge US pension plans like CalSTRS and the New York State Common Retirement Fund often enforce new policies on asset managers and companies ...Continue reading...
As a longtime Christian bookseller, I figured I'd enjoy a fellow bookseller's ode to browsing, buying, and reading. Here's why it left me feeling conflicted.When the book In Praise of Good Bookstores released earlier this year, I started hearing from bookish friends and customers of Hearts & Minds, the Pennsylvania bookstore my wife and I have run together for almost 40 years. They would send us links to an interview with the author, Jeff Deutsch, a bookstore manager himself.For many, the conversation evoked memories and hopes of one of the great pleasures this side of Eden: browsing a well-stocked and interesting bookstore. Naturally, as a longtime bookseller, I shared the interview and devoured the book. But I’ll admit that Deutsch’s perspectives made me a bit uneasy, and I am still trying to decipher my curious reaction toward a book most friends figured I’d commend unreservedly. This side of Eden, few things are as simple as they seem.Scale and statusIn Praise of Good Bookstores gives a fascinating account of a former Jewish kid who grew up to love books and bookselling, and Deutsch waxes eloquent about the joy of connecting book and reader. He offers an intellectually stimulating essay that will appeal to those who like books about books, the reading life, and publishing-world curiosities.For many CT readers, In Praise of Good Bookstores would no doubt fit seamlessly alongside such titles as Karen Swallow Prior’s On Reading Well, Alan Jacobs’s Breaking Bread with the Dead, Jessica Hooten Wilson’s The Scandal of Holiness, and Claude Atcho’s Reading Black Books. Deutsch is as learned as any of those authors, and his obvious passion for books is contagious.What makes Deutsch’s book stand out (despite an oddly tacky cover) is his status as a bookseller. Like the best of our trade, he is mostly self-taught and exceedingly eclectic ...Continue reading...
He saw African American history as a “window into the essence of the gospel.”Carey Latimore IV, a Baptist minister and a historian who studied how Black people persevered by faith, died unexpectedly on Tuesday at the age of 46.Latimore was a beloved professor at Trinity University, in San Antonio, Texas, where he taught on the African American experience. Students were drawn to his enthusiasm and were frequently found in his office, discussing what they were learning in his classes and in the research projects he organized, like an oral history of race relations in San Antonio.Latimore also actively found ways to bring his scholarship to the public. He appeared frequently on local TV, started a civil rights institute in downtown San Antonio before the pandemic, worked with the Alamo Citizen Advisory Committee, and wrote devotionals for Our Daily Bread.In the last few years, he became an important resource for those seeking to understand the significance of Juneteenth, the holiday celebrating the end of slavery in America. Latimore was especially adept at explaining the religious significance and encouraging Christians and the church to embrace Juneteenth.“I think Black people in their faith were kind of presenting a mirror and a window into the essence of the gospels that many people have forgotten or left behind,” he told Rasool Berry, pastor of The Bridge Church in Brooklyn, New York, on the Christianity Today podcast Where Ya From? “On Juneteenth, people start talking about what we can be, what we can do. What we have done. It’s an inspiring moment because we think of the possibilities.”The people who worked with Latimore were shocked by the news of his death. They mourned both loss of a public scholar and a personal friend.Continue reading...
Founded by an enslaved minister in 1776, the historic Baptist site had been covered by a museum parking lot.It’s different when you get down to the bone.Jack Gary, director of archaeology at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, can get excited talking about the excavation of old post holes and brick foundations. He’s thrilled when his team finds bits of bottles, old coins, and the porcelain foot of a long-lost baby doll, giving them a glimpse of what life was like at a historic Baptist church where enslaved Black people lifted their voices to God.But the buried remains of these faithful Christians—once covered over by a parking lot—reveal their full humanity.“It doesn’t hit you until you see a bone you recognize: That’s a piece of a person. You are touching another human,” Gary told CT.The Colonial Williamsburg archaeologist and his team started excavating the 40 or 41 graves at the church on Monday, slowly and carefully removing about a foot of soil from the first three sites. They believe it is one of the oldest Black congregations in America, founded at the time of the Declaration of Independence by an enslaved man named Gowan Pamphlet, who was a given special allowance for ordination by the woman who owned him.The building that housed the congregation was demolished in the 1950s as part of the ongoing reconstruction and restoration of the former capital of colonial Virginia. No one in authority at the time appears to have thought the church was an important enough part of that history to preserve, continuing the generations-long practice of diminishing or even erasing Black people from the American story.Connie Matthews Harshaw, a descendent of the Christians who worshiped there, started pushing and organizing for the recovery of the church in 2019. She convinced Cliff Fleet, ...Continue reading...
While most of us thought that we had a government of the people, by the people, for the people, we do not and have not had one for many decades. The transformation has been in the works for over 100 years, but the final weapon...
Show all results in news 

FamilyNet Top Sites Top Independent Baptist Sites KJV-1611 Authorized Version Topsites Preaching Tools. Net Top 100 Websites Top Local New Testament Baptist Church Sites Cyberspace Ministry - Top Christian Sites

Powered by Ekklesia-Online

Locations of visitors to this page free counters