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by John HendryxFrom the beginning to the end of John's Gospel, Jesus has a definitive train of thought regarding whom He came to save. In John 6 (for example) during a discussion about faith with some Jews, Jesus declared, "All that the Father gives me will come to me" (John 6:37) - From this text we understand that all the people that the Father gives to the Son will come to faith in him. It does not read "some" of those given by the Father will come to faith but instead reads "all" those the Father has given the Son will come to faith in Him. Note that it also teaches that the giving to the Son precedes their believing in Him. (also see John 6:63, 65)Lets make some other connections with this phrase from another part of the Gospel of John:
by B. B. Warfield“The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the foremost.” 1 Timothy 1:15Christ Jesus came to save sinners.Not, then, merely to prepare salvation for them; to open to them a pathway to salvation; to remove the obstacles in the way of their salvation; to proclaim as a teacher a way of salvation; to introduce as a ruler conditions of life in which clean living becomes for the first time possible; to bring motives to holy action to bear upon us; to break down our enmity to God by an exhibition of His seeking love; to manifest to us what sin is in the sight of God, and how He will visit it with His displeasure. All these things He undoubtedly does. But all these things together touch but the circumference of His work for man. Under no interpretation of the nature or reach of His work can it be truly said that Christ Jesus came to do these things. For that we must penetrate deeper, and say with the primitive Church, in this faithful saying commended to us by the apostle, that Christ Jesus came to save sinners.
by John Calvin "Man is never sufficiently touched and affected by the awareness of his lowly state until he has compared himself with God's majesty." - John CalvinIn the following section in Institutes, Calvin lays bare the true condition of our hearts in light of the majesty and holiness of God. He says:
by John CalvinSo whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.” (Matthew 7:12)It is an exhortation to his [Christ's] disciples to be just, and contains a short and simple definition of what justice means. We are here informed, that the only reason why so many quarrels exist in the world, and why men inflict so many mutual injuries on each other, is, that they knowingly and willingly trample justice under their feet, while every man rigidly demands that it shall be maintained towards himself.Where our own advantage is concerned, there is not one of us, who cannot explain minutely and ingeniously what ought to be done. And since every man shows himself to be a skilful teacher of justice for his own advantage, how comes it, that the same knowledge does not readily occur to him, when the profit or loss of another is at stake, but because we wish to be wise for ourselves only, and no man cares about his neighbours? What is more, we maliciously and purposely shut our eyes upon the rule of justice, which shines in our hearts. Christ therefore shows, that every man may be a rule of acting properly and justly towards his neighbours, if he do to others what he requires to be done to him. He thus refutes all the vain pretences, which men contrive for hiding or disguising their injustice. Perfect justice would undoubtedly prevail among us, if we were as faithful in learning active charity, (if we may use the expression,) as we are skilful in teaching passive charity.~John Calvin-----
J. I. PackerThe Attributes of God (MP3 Series) Sydney Anglican Network Audio Sermons. The following files are in MP3 format.To download MP3, right click and save the file to your hard drive.Language About God - Part 1Language About God - Part 2The Character of GodThe Concept of God - Part 1The Concept of God - Part 2The Concept of God - Part 3The Triunity of God - Part 1The Triunity of God - Part 2The Trinity - Part 1The Trinity - Part 2Transcendence and CharacterGod's Praiseworthiness
The following eBooks on the doctrine of justification by grace alone, through faith alone are free for download. Remember when downloading, use your default browser, NOT your Facebook app. (FB app does not recognize eBooks)The Doctrine of Justification: An Outline of its History in the Church; And of Its Exposition From Scripture (eBook)by James BuchananThe Doctrine of Justification (eBook)by A W PinkThe Doctrine of Justification by Faith (eBook)by John OwenJustification, the Law, and the Righteousness of Christ (eBook)by Charles HodgeJustification by Faith Alone (eBook)by Martin LutherThe Benefit of Christ Crucified (Book)by Don BenedettoThe Everlasting Righteousness (eBook)by Horatius BonarThe Rent Veil (eBook)by Horatius BonarSola Fide: The Reformed Doctrine of Justification (eBook)by J I PackerConsolations from Christ's Imputed Righteousness (eBook)by Thomas Brooks-------Bonus Resources
Enter for the Opportunity to Win 100+ BooksMonergism Books is having its biggest giveaway ever. To enter the drawing please do the following two (2) things:1) follow us on the Monergism Books Facebook page (if you have not already done so) and2) sign up for our weekly newsletterIf you have already signed up for both of these you will be automatically entered for the drawing to win 100+ Christian books/DVDs. Drawing will take place on Tuesday, November 14th, 2017Please note: the winner must have a a shipping address in the USA.One Hundred Books
Below are several free eBook on the ReformationThe Reformers and the Theology of the Reformation (eBook)by William CunninghamHistorical Theology (eBook)by William CunninghamHistory of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century (eBook)by J. H. Merle D'AubigneDawn of the Reformation (eBook)by Herbert B WorkmanWilliam Farel: The Story of the Swiss Reformation (eBook)by Earl M BlackburnThe Necessity of Reforming the Church (eBook) by John CalvinLife of Martin Luther (eBook)by Joel R Beeke-----The Reformation: A Visual Timeline (.pdf)by Matt Chandler
I have read some critical remarks of Lordship salvation which have some validity. These criticisms have indeed been true with some erroneous presentations of Lordship that appear to be nothing more than a works-based based gospel which give the impression that salvation, at least partly, has to do with our commitment every bit as much as Christ's cross. However, just like any doctrine, things tend to go awry when humans are involved... but if understood rightly, biblically I believe that it actually conforms to the Reformed confessions and, more importantly, to the Bible's central message of salvation by grace alone in Christ alone. Because of this I wish to write a very short piece to bring some clarity to the issue.What is Lordship?When the Holy Spirit touches or quickens a person's heart, they recognize immediately that because of their sinful rebellion against a Holy God, that they justly deserve the His wrath and know sin to be their greatest burden and enemy. Yet being in captivity and bondage to it, they despair of all hope in their flesh (Phil 3:3), knowing there is nothing they can do to save themselves. So they appeal to Christ Jesus as their only hope to deliver them from both the guilt and power of sin. They know only He can save them from God's wrath and sin's captivity. That is why he is called the Savior.
Many classics of ther Christian faith are out of the average person's price range. We have made some of them available for free. iPhone, iPad Users: To open ePub in iPhone open the file with Safari, NOT YOUR FACEBOOK APP. You must tap the 3 vertical dots in the bottom right, which says Open in Safari then tap the epub link and then tap Open in iBooks in the top right. Hope this helpsAndroid Users: Open with Google Play Books (default on your device). Even if you usually use Kindle there may be an even simpler option for downloading eBooks on Monergism to your Android: tap on the ePub file on the Monergism download page as it will automatically open in Google Play Books, an app that comes default with your Android device. Seems to have most of the features of Kindle and it opens up right in your device without the extra steps...Kindle Users: You can always upload .mobi files to your device with a USB cord to the folder called "documents" ... but if you upload eBooks often, I would encourage you to1) get the free app from Amazon called "send to Kindle" which will wirelessly upload the file to your Kindle device(s) in an instant. Or2) you may also send them as an attachment to your [email protected] email address which also sends it wirelessly to your Kindle.-----1. Augustine, Confessions2. Athanasius, On the Incarnation3. Martin Luther, The Bondage of the Will
Repentance does not mean you simply stop sinning. It means, rather, by the grace of God, turning to the only one who has the power to enable you to do so. Being a Christian is not a self-salvation project but an appeal to the grace of God in Jesus Christ as our only hope. Otherwise, left to ourselves, none of us could change. EVER. No amount of therapy or will power could help. Before Christ opened our heart to the gospel, we are all caught in ways of bondage that we could not change. If we could change ourselves we would not need Christ. Part of the problem is that people are still stuck on trying, at least partly, to save themselves. But what is impossible with man (faith, repentance) is possible with God. (Luke 18:27)Jesus said to them, "It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners."Just like you don't need a doctor unless you are sick, in a similar way you don't need a Savior unless you are a sinner. Jesus came to save those who know themselves to be sinners. Man is naturally proud and does not want to admit he is a rebel sinner in need of rescue. In context to the above quote the Pharisees are questioning Jesus as to why he eats with tax collectors and sinners. Thinking themselves more righteous than the rest, these Pharisees are revealed to be people who do not admit they are sinners in need of grace, but proud and think they deserve God's favor. So the call to repentance begins with acknowledging that you are caught in sin, incapable of freeing yourself from its' captivity and an appeal to Christ alone for deliverance from sin's guilt and power.
Thus says the LORD: "Let not the wise man boast in his wisdom, let not the mighty man boast in his might, let not the rich man boast in his riches, but let him who boasts boast in this, that he understands and knows me, that I am the LORD" Jeremiah 9:23-24IntroductionOf all the possible pursuits, activities, or studies that are practically relevant and positively beneficial which we might spend our time pursuing, there is none, however profitable or necessary, that is as needful and uplifting and valuable as the subject matter of this study. As Christians, there is nothing more practical for us than to know our God. As created beings, there is nothing we need more than to understand our Creator. As desperate and wandering souls searching for significance, longing for something that is infinitely satisfying, seeking pleasure from finite things when God "œhas set eternity in [our] heart" (Ecclesiastes 3:11), there is nothing that can even begin to answer to the depths of our vast needs, desires, and longings, except for one thing. That one thing is knowing our God. And that one thing is what we are hoping by his grace to pursue in this study. I hope that all of us can resonate with the truth A. W. Pink once observed, that "œa spiritual and saving knowledge of God is the greatest need of every human creature," and furthermore, that "œthe foundation of all true knowledge of God must be a clear mental apprehension of His perfections as revealed in Holy Scripture." As we turn to the scriptures, it is with the hope and prayer that God will " shine in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ" (II Corinthians 4:6).
And God sent me before you to preserve for you a remnant on earth, and to keep alive for you many survivors. So it was not you who sent me here, but God. He has made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house and ruler over all the land of Egypt. Gen. 45:7-8For the last few days I have been reading the Genesis story of Joseph to my 6 year old son and pointed out that there were many similarities (or types) in the stories between Joseph and Jesus. On our way to the bus stop we talked about the Scripture that shows where both of them were betrayed, and my son quickly responded by declaring that God also brought about a good outcome through that same betrayal. I was delighted to see that he made this connection. In both cases God intended that the evil choices of men would be the means to bring about deliverance for His people. Joseph was a type of Christ in that he suffered unjustly by his brethren and then ended up saving many of the very people who originally intended to do him harm.I often use passages such as Genesis 50:20 as well as Acts 2 & 4 in theological debates to show God's meticulous providence that he can even ordain evil to bring about a good purpose. "As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today." - Gen 50:20this Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men." - Acts 2:23
Guest Post by Steve Hays1. Two recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida renewed perennial debates about the problem of natural evil. Calvinists and freewill theists give different answers. A friend asked me to comment on this old screed by Rachel Held Evans: I rarely read RHE. Outrage is crack cocaine for folks like RHE. The moral satisfaction of waxing judgmental gives them a temporary high. They're addicted to indignation. They live for indignation. Because the high wears off, they are constantly on the lookout for something wax indignant about. In her post, RHE uses John Piper as a foil to attack Calvinism in general. She also uses the occasion as a pretext to launch into a gratuitous tirade against C. J. Mahaney. I say gratuitous because that has nothing to do with natural evil. In this post I'm not going to comment on the allegations against Mahaney, both because it's a red herring in relation to the primary topic of her post, and simply because I'm in no position to offer an informed opinion regarding his complicity, if any, in the scandal.
by Thaddeus Williams“For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”(2 Corinthians 5:21)What is substitutionary atonement?The cross of Jesus is where the substitutionary atonement happened. On the cross, Jesus served as our substitute and atoned for our sin (2 Corinthians 5:21).At the cross, our sin became Christ's sin, our blameworthiness became Christ's blameworthiness, the wrath we deserve from an infinitely just Being became the wrath He absorbed from an infinitely just Being. It made salvation possible for spiritually dead sinners wrought with guilt. As if this weren't good news enough, Christ's blamelessness became our blamelessness, Christ's reward became our reward, Christ's perfection our perfection, and Christ's confident standing before the holy and just Father became our confident standing before the holy and just Father.We can no more improve on Christ's imputed righteousness than we can count past infinity.“This is our acquittal: the guilt that held us liable for punishment has been transferred to the head of the Son of God…We must, above all, remember this substitution, lest we tremble and remain anxious throughout life—as if God's righteous vengeance, which the Son of God has taken upon himself, still hung over us….[To] take away all cause for enmity and to reconcile us utterly to himself, he wipes out all evil in us by the expiation set forth in the death of Christ; that we, who were previously unclean and impure, may show ourselves righteous and holy in his sight.”(John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, vol. 2, pp. 506, 510)
Yes, I believe God ordains all that comes to pass (Eph 1:11) If a calamity occurs in a city has not the LORD done it?" (Amos 3:6). After losing all ten of his children after a great wind had caused the collapse of his son's house, Job says, "The LORD gave and the LORD has taken away. Blessed be the name of the LORD" (Job 1:21). After being covered with boils he says, "Shall we indeed accept good from God and not accept adversity?" (Job 2:10). Our world has been under judgment since the Fall, so there is sickness, death and calamity.Jesus declared that disasters are reminders that we all live in our fallen world, of life's precariousness and ought to cause us all to repent:(Quote) "...those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them: do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others who lived in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.” (Luke 13:1–5)Does this mean we (the church) should sit on our hands? No, I am thankful that God also ordains that his church would engage in acts of mercy and pray ... and that the prayers of His saints will play a role in, and affect the outcome of events and be instrumental in the salvation of souls. God ordains both the means and the ends.
When the Holy Spirit regenerates a man and joins him to Christ, He shows him the heinousness of his sin. Seeing he cannot save himself from it, the sinner appeals to Christ to deliver him both from 1) sin's guilt and 2) from its power; from God's wrath and from sin's bondage; to not only justify him, but to sanctify him --- to apply the double cure. Christ did not die for our sin so we could have peace with sin but so that we would go to war with sin. No regenerate man says 'Lord forgive my guilt but leave me in my bondage to my sin.' No, by the grace of God, he flees from sin to Christ for salvation - salvation from God's wrath as well as deliverance from our sinful self, for the power of the Spirit to put off sin. So unlike some modern teaching, salvation does not merely consist of being delivered from God's wrath but includes much more. Many in the justification-only crowd and some liberal theologians have used this theology as an excuse to live in sin. But as J. I. Packer once said, "A half-truth masquerading as the whole truth becomes a complete untruth."
A common misunderstanding about amillennialism is that “covenant theologians regard the kingdom of God as a wholly invisible and wholly present reality with no future, earthly fulfillment.” It is argued that because amillennialists have no place in their eschatological scheme for Jesus reigning upon a earthly throne in Jerusalem, they therefore by necessity have no place for an earthly, consummated kingdom. Far to the contrary, the amillennial position on the nature of God's kingdom is that it is both a present and future reality – i.e., that it is both already-and-not-yet, inaugurated but not consummated – and that both these present and future elements of the kingdom include spiritual as well as earthly dimensions. This fulfillment, however, will not take place during a future millennial period but rather at the end of the age when Christ returns and heaven and earth are renewed. To say that because amillennialists do not affirm Christ's earthly reign “from a throne in Jerusalem” then they cannot affirm an earthly future for God's kingdom is to confuse a particular (premillennial) understanding of what Christ's reign will look like with the broader category of God's kingdom. Such an assertion would be similar to an amillennialist saying that because premillennialists do not affirm that Satan is currently bound so they cannot affirm the current, spiritual presence of God's kingdom.The follow excepts conclusively show that the above position is the amillennial position.Kim Riddlebarger, A Case for Amillennialism
Just a couple of comments on one of the articles in the Nashville StatementARTICLE 10WE AFFIRM that it is sinful to approve of homosexual immorality or transgenderism and that such approval constitutes an essential departure from Christian faithfulness and witness.WE DENY that the approval of homosexual immorality or transgenderism is a matter of moral indifference about which otherwise faithful Christians should agree to disagree------If I may add my 2 cents to Article 10:Those within the visible church who APPROVE of homosexual immorality are not acting in love toward our neighbor but, for fear of man's opinion, are denying him or her the gospel, which is the only hope for any of us. Those churches who approve are, therefore, guilty of doing harm and/or murdering souls.If I say to the wicked, ‘You shall surely die,' and you give him no warning, nor speak to warn the wicked from his wicked way, in order to save his life, that wicked person shall die for his iniquity, but his blood I will require at your hand." - Ezek 3:18
While peace and global unity are laudable pursuits on the surface, such goals ought to be seen in the light of what took place at the Tower of Babe (Gen 11:1-9). This event stands as a stark warning against utopianism, against man's proud and unending use of politics, economics and false religion to attain global unity apart from God. Mankind's ability to fashion such a world was forfeited at the fall and until we return to our Creator, and embrace His appointed means to reach this goal, mankind's quest for global unity will inevitably end in chaos and utter destruction.According to Scripture, mankind will indeed finally succeed in creating this global counterfeit kingdom (Rev 13:8, 16:9, 17:8) but God will overthrow it, bring judgment on the earth, and join the family of man together under his righteous rule and bring in the only true lasting kingdom. (Rev 21)"And whereas thou sawest iron mixed with miry clay, they shall mingle themselves with the seed of men: but they shall not cleave one to another, even as iron is not mixed with clay.And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed: and the kingdom shall not be left to other people, but it shall break in pieces and consume all these kingdoms, and it shall stand for ever." Dan 2:43- 44
by Dean DavisNOTE: The essay below is an extract from the book, The High King of Heaven: Discovering the Master Keys to the Great End Time Debate by Dean Devis (Redemption Press, 2014). It deals with one of the great biblical signs of the imminence of the Consummation: the large-scale converision of ethnic Israel in the last of the Last Days. Though other biblical texts touch on this theme (see note 1), Romans 11:11-36 gives us the single most important discussion of this holy mystery. I hope you will enjoy my humble attempt to plumb its amazing depths.An Exposition of Romans 11:11-36Though this passage touches only indirectly upon the Consummation, it is of great importance, since here we are supplied with yet another outstanding sign of its imminence: the latter day conversion of ethnic Israel at large, leading swiftly to the Parousia and the Resurrection of the dead. Later, I will touch on some of the practical implications of this unique revelation for Christian life and ministry. First, however, we must examine the text itself, in order to see if this really is the apostle's message.Introduction
by Costi HinnProsperity is hot topic in the church. Does God care if a pastor drives a nice car or lives in a nice home? Does God command that all who follow Him take a vow of poverty and starve their families in a protest of earthly comfort? Bible teachers sell millions of books and accumulate mass amounts of wealth, are they in the same league as other wealthy preachers? Some men will have deep convictions about attaining any measure of wealth, while others will be content use their wealth to give back to their church. Some will use their wealth to fund a child's college tuition, or even scholarship a seminary student. Others will invest their wealth with the goal of giving even more away in the future.Stewardship comes in all shapes and sizes but one thing doesn't—God's ability to weigh a man's heart and motives. It is a man's heart that God is most interested in and the gospel a man proclaims that God will judge most. When Heaven's final bell rings and every man is recompensed according to his deeds, God will have the final say. The issue will not be whether that pastor took home a six-figure salary; the issue will be what that man taught and wrote while representing the gospel of Jesus Christ.In this article, the prosperity gospel is placed front and center as one of the deadliest teachings in the world today. It has attached itself to the Bible, and to Jesus Christ—though it has no business doing so. Billions chase after it in search of stability and hope. Yet, all those who live and die trusting in the prosperity gospel for salvation will be left wanting in both this life, and the next.What is Prosperity Gospel Theology?
What do we mean when we make the distinction between the visible and invisible church? And what is the reason for this distinction? Starting around the 4th century - the expression "Visible Church" was refered to by theologians, not to a building, but to the members on the rolls of a local church. In other words, all persons who are members of a local church are considered to be a part of the visible church.On the other hand, the invisible church refers to those persons who have actually been regenerated or quickened by the Holy Sprit, God's elect or true believers. Augustine referred to the church as a mixed body, a visible people, but this people has both tares and wheat, as described by Jesus. In other words, there is no such thing as a perfect church, and there will always people in the church there with bad motives or are there for the wrong reason. There will always be people who claim to love Christ but whose heart is far from Him. Many, Jesus says, will say on that day, did we not do this and that in your name? Jesus wil then say, "I never knew you". These are descriptions of some people now sitting in your local church and Jesus says of them that he "never knew them!!!" Some persons are in church for show, to be seen by men as pious, others perhaps for a social club or to show of their ability to wax eloquent when discussing theology. These persons hearts are completely invisible to us, but of course, they are not invisible to God and only He can know who is truly regenerate, so we must be generous in our judgements.The following is a detailed description of the orthodox doctrine of the visible and invisible church as explained by Pastor Brian Schwertley. It is well worth reading and quite helpful:
Our motivation makes the difference. The legalist obeys God's commands in order to attain and/or maintain their just standing before God; something that is clearly Christ's office alone. Evangelical obedience, if I may use that term, obeys out of a renewed heart. i.e. because he is born again and God's seed dwells in him (1 John 3:9). The thought of abiding in sin goes against the grain of who is is - a Spirit-indwelt believer whose heart now has the law of God written upon it.Being set free from the curse of the law means we are no longer under its condemnation (Rom 8:1) because Jesus has fulfilled the law on our behalf (Rom 8:3-4). But this does not mean we are to cease obeying God's commands."this is love for God: to keep his commands. And his commands are not burdensome, for everyone born of God overcomes the world." 1 John 5:3-4
A guest post by Steve HaysI've posted most of the definitions at one time or another, but it's useful to collate them in one place. Is Calvinism fatalistic? Is determinism synonymous with fatalism? Critics of Calvinism use "fatalism" as an inaccurate term of abuse, because it has invidious connotations that a neutral term does not. Here are some standard definitions and explanations of fatalism. Calvinism is not fatalistic: Fatalism, in its most usual sense, should not be confused with predestination. Fatalism asserts an abstract necessity without regard to causal antecedents and thus is diametrically opposed to predestination, in which causes and effects, ends and means, are determined in relation to one another. The use of means is rendered futile by fatalism, but not by predestination. The Encyclopedia of Christianity, 4:180. According to this view, then, determinism is the thesis that everything that occurs, including our deliberations and decisions, are causally necessitated by antecedent conditions. Fatalism, by contrast, is the doctrine that our deliberations and decisions are causally ineffective and make no difference to the course of events. In circumstances of fatalism what happens does not depend on how the agent deliberates. The relevant outcome will occur no matter what the agent decides. Clearly, however, determinism does not imply fatalism. While there are some circumstances in which deliberation is futile (i.e. 'local fatalism'), deliberation is nevertheless generally effective in a deterministic world.

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