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What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
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C.I.B.C. - PREACHING - 26 April 2017 Wednesday Night - Pastor Hoose PLEASE SUBSCRIBE! Enjoy this video of some great bible preaching during one of our services. If you want to find out more about our church please visit our ...
Why do bad things happen to good people? - Baptist Preaching - Pastor Daniel Pigott What does the bible say about bad things that happen to "good" people? Pastor Daniel Pigott goes through nine key things.
BR Lakin Pleasure Seekers

This sermon is presented in full from the Landmark Hour from the mid 1960s. The sermon itself starts at 15:10. Before the sermon is the standard Landmark Hour opening with Dr. talking about Herb before Till The Storm Passes By.

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Today the Supreme Court refused to take up the case of Coach Joe Kennedy, but some of the justices nonetheless sent a signal in favor of religious liberty.Coach Kennedy, represented by our friends at First Liberty Institute, is a Christian high school football coach from Bremerton, Washington, who was punished after taking a knee and praying on the field after games. His case has been deliberated in federal district court, then the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, before making its way to the Supreme Court.While the Court’s refusal to hear the case is not ideal, it appears that unresolved factual questions (the lower court never concluded whether Coach Kennedy was punished for praying or neglecting his professional duties) prevented the Court from hearing the full case and taking up the First Amendment free speech claim.Justice Alito, joined by Justices Thomas, Gorsuch, and Kavanaugh, penned a separate statement (see pp. 8-13) explaining that while he understands and agrees with the Court’s reason for not taking the case right now (if asked to do so, he would direct the lower court to reach a conclusion on this question, but at this point the Court was only asked to decide the legal question), he doesn’t necessarily agree with the lower court rulings, which appear problematic for religious liberty and the First Amendment:While I thus concur in the denial of the present petition, the Ninth Circuit’s understanding of the free speech rights of public school teachers is troubling and may justify review in the future.Alito criticized the “highly tendentious way” the Ninth Circuit applied the case of Garcetti v. Ceballos (dealing with the First Amendment rights of public employees) to Coach Kennedy’s situation, which would have required public school employees like teachers and coaches to refrain from any religious activity a student might see or the school might not like, from the time the teacher or coach shows up in the morning until the time they leave. Alito concluded:If the Ninth Circuit continues to apply [this] interpretation of Garcetti in future cases involving public school teachers or coaches, review by this Court may be appropriate.Alito wasn’t finished:What is perhaps most troubling about the Ninth Circuit’s opinion is language that can be understood to mean that a coach’s duty to serve as a good role model requires the coach to refrain from any manifestation of religious faith—even when the coach is plainly not on duty. I hope that this is not the message that the Ninth Circuit meant to convey, but its opinion can certainly be read that way. After emphasizing that [Coach Kennedy] was hired to “communicate a positive message through the example set by his own conduct,” the court criticized him for “his media appearances and prayer in the [Bremerton High School (BHS)] bleachers (while wearing BHS apparel and surrounded by others).” [citation omitted] This conduct, in the opinion of the Ninth Circuit, “signal[ed] his intent to send a message to students and parents about appropriate behavior and what he values as a coach.” [citation omitted] But when [Coach Kennedy] prayed in the bleachers, he had been suspended. He was attending a game like any other fan. The suggestion that even while off duty, a teacher or coach cannot engage in any outward manifestation of religious faith is remarkable.It’s very encouraging to see Justice Alito on record noting the religious liberty problems with this case—something we’ve come to expect from him—along with Justices Thomas and Gorsuch. But it’s particularly heartening to see Justice Kavanaugh join this statement. While his judicial record would have suggested he’d rule the right way on religious liberty issues once seated on the Court, his refusal to join these three justices in dissenting from denial of cert in the Planned Parenthood defunding cases late last year left many wondering whether he would be a true originalist. While these actions don’t necessarily indicate how the justices will rule on the merits (there’s a good chance Justice Roberts still agrees with his originalist colleagues on these matters), they are heartening nevertheless.Justice Alito concluded by almost inviting Coach Kennedy to ask the Court to reconsider Trans World Airlines, Inc. v. Hardison, a Title VII case lowering employee protections against religious discrimination, and Employment Division v. Smith, which cut back on Free Exercise protections and prompted the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to be passed over twenty-five years ago.Let us hope Justices Alito, Thomas, Gorsuch, and Kavanaugh are prophesying where the Court is going on religious liberty.
Dr. King had a hope that was out of this world.Today, we remember the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.—a man who sacrificed much to advance the causes of the civil rights movement in the mid-twentieth century.It was a time in history when most African Americans living in the states weren’t given their due as U.S. citizens or image bearers of God.After the Civil war in the late 19th century, Jim Crow laws were established in the south keeping them from accessing the same basic public goods (education, public facilities etc.) as whites living in their town. In addition, voting rights were limited by voter literacy tests that were clearly put in place by states as a means to prevent African Americans from getting to the polls each election cycle.But King saw all of this—a messy mass of racism, discrimination, and untold abuses of power—and still could somehow utter the words, “I Have a Dream.” His dream was founded on a scriptural understanding of justice and our response to the Kingdom of God at hand. In his famous, often quoted, ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, King referred back to the prophesies of old, calling for a day to come when justice would “roll on like a river” and righteousness like a “never failing stream” (Amos 5:24).For years, King paddled up that stream with the currents of culture and legal precedent pressing towards him. He dealt with insults, abuse, imprisonment, and ultimately death for the sake of the cause he cared for so deeply. Despite the many forces fighting against King and his companions, their relentless pursuit of justice ultimately gave way to many of the governmental and societal reforms they had hoped for.What about White Clergy?King had to push other (white) ...Continue reading...
A young abortion activists’ profanity-laced tirade was caught on film during the 2019 Women’s March Saturday in Washington, D.C. Breitbart News captured the video during its coverage of the pro-abortion march. Two years ago, the march infamously kicked out several feminist groups that planned to attend after learning they were pro-life. Now, many liberal groups […]
Nehemiah 6:16 And it came to pass, that when all our enemies heard thereof, and all the heathen that were about us saw these things, they were much cast down in their own eyes: for they perceived that this work was wrought of our God. God did the work. The work had been from difficult […]
Sanctification beyond Standards Perhaps you have heard the statement, “Jesus loves you just as you are, but He loves you too much to allow you to stay that way.”It's true. God loves us unconditionally, and He doesn't love us more or less based on if we are currently growing or backsliding. But He does call us to grow in Him.For this is the will of God, even your sanctification…—1 Thessalonians 4:3Sometimes I'm afraid we give the idea that sanctification is the process of developing more or “higher” Christian standards.Standards that are rooted in biblical principles are certainly part of how we live out the process of sanctification. But they aren't the starting place…or the ending place.So what are the ingredients for this biblical process of sanctification?1. Gospel MotivationFor the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead: And that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them, and rose again.—2 Corinthians 5:14–15This isn't about us trying harder to white-knuckle our way with stronger discipline and higher standards. It is about us knowing Jesus and being compelled by His love.God calls us to grow in our knowledge of Him and in His grace.But grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.—2 Peter 3:18Grace is the inner disposition of God in our hearts, and it motivates us to “both to will and to do of his good pleasure” (Philippians 2:13).2. Holy Spirit ConvictionWe're not left to ourselves to figure out in what areas we need to grow. This isn't a process of trying to copy other Christians or measure up to random expectations.The Holy Spirit who indwells us (Ephesians 1:12) works in our hearts. He convicts us and shows us where we're wrong when we grieve Him.And grieve not the holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption.—Ephesians 4:30Sometimes He does this in my life as I read His Word, sometimes through preaching, sometimes in a moment when I am displeasing Him.When the Holy Spirit convicts us, we can respond, or we can quench His voice.Quench not the Spirit.—1 Thessalonians 5:19We grow in grace as we respond to the Holy Spirit's conviction.3. Biblical ApplicationThe Bible is God's gift to us for this process, and it is central to it.All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness:—2 Timothy 3:16Doctrine teaches us what is right. The Bible gives clear direction on what is right and wrong. If we want to believe and walk in truth, we must spend time in God's Word. One of the outflows of that will be developing personal standards based on biblical convictions from God's Word.Reproof points out where we are wrong. The Holy Spirit often uses His Word to convict us of sin and point out where we are grieving Him.Correction leads us how to get right. God's Word does more than just condemn wrongdoing; it shows us how we can gain restored fellowship with God and begin living a purified life.Instruction teaches us how to go forward on the right path. Through His Word, God nurtures and cultivates His likeness in our lives (2 Peter 1:4).Do you want to grow in sanctification this year?You need motivation, conviction, and application.Let the love of Christ in the gospel motivate you. Respond to the conviction of the Holy Spirit. Increase your personal application of God's Word.
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