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What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
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Videos

Why do bad things happen to good people? - Baptist Preaching - Pastor Daniel Pigott What does the bible say about bad things that happen to "good" people? Pastor Daniel Pigott goes through nine key things.
Preaching Christ To The Heathen  – Galatians 1:12-24  –  Pastor D. A. Waite  –  BFTBC Preaching Christ To The Heathen – Galatians 1:12-24 – Pastor D. A. Waite – BFTBC Sunday, January 1, 2017 Bible For Today Baptist Church of Collingswood, ...
Galatians 5:1 | Stand Fast | Independent Baptist This video is a sermon preached at Bible Baptist Church in Puyallup, WA. The title of the message is "Stand Fast." It is based from Galatians 5:1. I use rodeo bull ...
Where to Hear How To Be Saved | Independent Baptist preaching This video is short piece out of a message preached at Bible Baptist Church of Puyallup. The point the video makes is, I believe, true. But the video itself is ...
1 Timothy 2:9-10 | Women in Modest Apparel | Independent Baptist Preaching This is a Sunday school lesson taught at Bible Baptist Church in Puyallup, WA. The text is 1 Timothy 2:9-10. The context is the Apostle Paul teaching his ...
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News

Link: https://www.beautifulchristianlife.com/blog/what-is-the-significance-of-clouds-i...Format: Web PageTopic(s): TypologyAuthor(s)/Speaker(s): Nicholas T Batzig
The Babylonian conquest of Jerusalem more than 2,500 years ago was one of the key moments in biblical history, representing God's judgment but also his grace and mercy.
Three things American Christians can glean from our brothers and sisters on international missions.A former Anglican bishop tells the story of when he served as the chaplain of Worcester College, Oxford. It was his duty and privilege to greet every incoming freshman, welcoming them to the university and offering them his guidance. He recalls that the vast majority of students replied in basically the same way: “You won’t be seeing much of me,” they’d say. “I don’t believe in god.”At this I suspect many Christians would want to launch into a full-scale apologetic, defending the rationality of theism and imploring the student to believe the gospel. Instead, the wise bishop would say, “Oh, that’s interesting. Which god is it that you don’t believe in?”After recovering from his surprising response, most students would go on to describe some kind of angry sky fairy who occasionally intervened in human affairs but whose main activity involves little more than sending bad people to hell and allowing good people into heaven. To the amazement of nearly every student, the bishop would then reply, “Well, I don’t believe in that god either.”Welcome to Post-Christian AmericaThere was a time in the Western world when the word “God” had a significant level of intelligibility. Virtually everyone recognized God as a reference to the supernatural being who revealed himself in the life of Jesus of Nazareth (John 1:14–18). Even atheists used the word God in this way, for to be an atheist in the West was to disbelieve in this specific deity.Today, however, the West is a secularizing, post-Christian culture. And though all of America isn’t post-Christian yet, even the Bible Belt isn’t far behind. We have arrived at the point where ...Continue reading...
As digital reading habits rewire our brains, how will we process the Bible differently?Christianity is a religion of the Word. Christians are a “People of the Book.” These distinctives have defined the Christian faith from the beginning, even before the age of print that brought us books. As we enter what many are calling a post-literate age, pastors can help remind people that the essence of the Christian faith centers on the Word (and words).From the carving of the Ten Commandments to the writing of the Torah to the copying and distribution of letters in the early church, God’s plan was for his people to read. However, as the way we read in this digital age changes, so too the character of the church will change. How will those reading habits affect the way we interact with the Bible? How will the way people read the Bible alter the church body?A Unique Relationship with WordsLong before the printing press and widespread literacy, God was cultivating a relationship with his chosen people focused on the written word. The words God carved into stone at Mount Sinai included a caution against images, setting up a peculiar word-based relationship with his followers that contrasted starkly with the image-worshiping pagan nations surrounding the Israelites (an observation made by Neil Postman in Amusing Ourselves to Death).This trend continues through church history, according to David Lyle Jeffrey in People of the Book. Medieval paintings frequently depict Mary, other biblical figures, and church fathers holding the Bible. Such images, even—or especially—when anachronistic (bound books did not exist when Mary bore Christ), symbolize the centrality of reading to Christian faithfulness and point out the concrete, tangible nature of the Word. In many of these paintings, the subject is ...Continue reading...
US Christians are growing in their faith, but many do it on their own, according to LifeWay Research.Over the past decade, more believers are heeding the scriptural call to “grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior”—but they’re often doing discipleship on their own.A wide-ranging survey by LifeWay Research found that while US Christians had made improvements in areas like reading their Bibles daily, prioritizing obedience to Christ, and avoiding temptation, their connections with fellow Christians have weakened.Hispanic and African American churchgoers may represent an exception to the overall trend, showing even greater progress in discipleship while deepening community ties.The results came from this year’s 2019 Discipleship Pathway Assessment, which tracks eight measures of belief and practice, and can be compared to a similar study LifeWay conducted in 2011.Among Protestants who attend church at least once each month: Most believe that an essential part of following Christ is saying “no” to the self and living to glorify God. This year, 66 percent of believers agreed with the statement, “A Christian must learn to deny himself or herself to serve Christ.” Slightly fewer (64%) churchgoers prioritized obedience when LifeWay studied Christian discipleship in 2011. They are spending more time in the Word. In 2019, 59 percent of churchgoers read the Bible every day or a few times each week, compared with 45 percent in 2011. Over three-quarters of respondents agreed with the statement, “I try to avoid situations in which I might be tempted to think or do immoral things,” up from 73 percent who agreed in 2011.Walking with God, but not othersDespite the gains, the 2019 study shows that today’s Christians struggle to build relationships and share ...Continue reading...
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