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J. Bennett Collins - Excuses (Pt. 1 of 3) Brother Collins was born in Greenville, South Carolina. He was converted at the early age of 7 years in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in the House-Ramsay Revival Crusade. Brother Collins began preaching at 15 years of age with the Lynn Garden
J. Bennett Collins - Excuses (Pt. 1 of 3) Brother Collins was born in Greenville, South Carolina. He was converted at the early age of 7 years in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in the House-Ramsay Revival Crusade. Brother Collins began preaching at 15 years of age with the Lynn Garden
J. Bennett Collins - Excuses (Pt. 2 of 3) Brother Collins was born in Greenville, South Carolina. He was converted at the early age of 7 years in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in the House-Ramsay Rev...
J. Bennett Collins - Excuses (Pt. 3 of 3) Brother Collins was born in Greenville, South Carolina. He was converted at the early age of 7 years in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in the House-Ramsay Rev...
Maze Jackson - At Last (Pt. 1 of 3)

Maze Jackson (1923-1996) was an American Independent Baptist evangelist, best known as Brother Maze to fellow preachers and friends. The Truck Driver's Special was a long-running radio series popular among truckers and their families, as well as believers from border to border and coast to coast. He was also the editor of The Preacher's Goldmine, a sermon and Bible study magazine for ministers. A series of digests from this magazine was called Golden Nuggets.

Born and raised in Hendersonville, North Carolina, Jackson made his home in Atlanta, Georgia. His wife, known as "Sister Dot," worked with him in his ministry.

Many of Jackson's sermons are available today on the Internet. Johnny the Baptist's website presents over thirty hours of Jackson's sermons (in RealAudio format), with plans to increase to a hundred hours. Repeats of The Truck Driver's Special continue to air in some American radio markets.

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The Reverend William Barber from North Carolina made news this week by claiming in an interview on prayer for President Trump that it “borders on heresy when you can p-r-a-y for a president” while they are “preying” on others. This, in his view, is “violating the most sacred principles of religion.”Assuming Reverend Barber looks to the Bible as his spiritual authority, I would suggest that the “principles of religion” demand the exact opposite—they actually require the Christian to pray for all leaders. Indeed, if this borders on heresy, a portion of the New Testament may be heretical.1 Timothy 2:1-3 says: “I urge you, first of all, to pray for all people. Ask God to help them; intercede on their behalf, and give thanks for them. Pray this way for kings and all who are in authority so that we can live peaceful and quiet lives marked by godliness and dignity. This is good and pleases God our Savior” (emphasis mine).This command is non-negotiable for every Christian; it doesn’t matter if we agree with the leader or not—as several ministers recently pointed out in rebuttal to Barber. Not all may have voted for President Trump, but he now is the president, and we all should hope and pray that he brings blessing to our nation. Similarly, not all may have voted for President Obama—I was in the camp who did not. But once he became president, it became a requirement of me and every other Christian who did not vote for him to nevertheless pray for the president to do well in God’s sight.Christians should always speak truth to power. Yet we can do this while we also pray for God to bless the nation through the leaders he has appointed over us.Reverend Barber and I do see eye to eye on one overarching point—that faith should inform the public life of our nation. We agree that it is proper for a minister, pastor, or theologian to offer their views in the public square. Reverend Barber is doing this, and so do I. In that sense, he is a religious liberty advocate just like myself.While Christians may differ on the application of that faith, we still agree that it should speak to our society—as opposed to those who think religion has no role in the public square at all. Rev. Barber and I would both say they are completely wrong. Let both his and my supporters unify on this point, for Christianity has much with which to benefit and bless our nation. Regardless of our differences on how it is applied, we should rally together to defend its place in the public life of our nation.
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Greetings from FRC Action! We wanted to share the following information with you from our friends at North Carolina Values Coalition. If you have previously received this message, please simply disregard this second contact. We did, however, want to make certain that you, your friends, and your ...
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