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What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
From @ChristianHumor on Facebook
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
Oldies but goodies...
What The Bible Says Good Samaritan's Penny Pulpit by Pastor Ed Rice
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Berean Beacon Catholic Inquisition Torture 2007 over 50MILLION men women and BABIES were MURDERED by the christians in the inquisition for 600yrs they tortured , burnt alive, and FORCED the survivors to join there human worship pagan cult. no1 is more evil or barbaric as the christians. they truly
CONSEQUENCES OF ROMAN CATHOLIC HERO JOHN HENRY NEWMAN'S EUCHARISTIC DEVOTION TO BREAD CAKES & WAFERS "Blessed" Romanist Cardinal John Henry Newman, (1801 to 1890) affected England's history. Among Newman's most serious errors was teaching physical objects became God Himself, particularly items used in the eucharistic Roman rites during their "Mass."
EX-ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST CONTRASTS CHRIST'S PRIESTHOOD TO ROME'S PARODY OF A PRIESTHOOD Richard Bennett, a former Roman Catholic Dominican priest for 22 years & a Roman Catholic for 48 years (see his website: BEREANBEACON.ORG), presents the difference between the Biblical priesthood of Jesus Christ & the Roman Catholic parody of
INTERVIEW WITH FORMER ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS & A NUN ON WHY THEY LEFT THE CHURCH OF ROME Former Roman Catholic priests Richard Bennett (website: BEREANBEACON.ORG) & Bartholomew Brewer, Ph.D, author of "Pilgrimage from Rome - A Testimony" (website: MISSIONTOCATHOLICS.COM) and former nun Rocio Zwirner give glory to God for their exodus
CHRISTIAN ANSWERS TOPICAL VIDEO: ROMAN CATHOLICISM ANALYZED BY FORMER RC DOMINICAN PRIEST Christian Answers topical videos are short 30 minute or less analytical reviews of certain theological subjects even though this ministry may have much more detailed material available. This particular clip comes from a presentation entitled, "The
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Investigation by Fort Worth Star-Telegram finds 400 allegations against 168 leaders spanning almost 200 churches and institutions.Hundreds of women and men have accused leaders of independent fundamental Baptist churches of sexual misconduct in a major investigative report published last weekend by the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.The series uncovered 412 allegations of abuse across nearly 200 churches and institutions, which by definition exist apart from denominational affiliations and in contrast to more mainstream Baptist or evangelical bodies like the Southern Baptist Convention.“From Connecticut to California, the stories are tragically similar: A music minister molested a 15-year-old girl in North Carolina and moved to another church in Florida,” the Star-Telegram wrote. “Another girl’s parents stood in front of their Connecticut congregation to acknowledge their daughter’s ‘sin’ after she was abused by her youth pastor, beginning at 16. This year, four women accused a pastor in California of covering up sexual misconduct and shielding the abusers over almost 25 years.”In all, 168 leaders—including some of the most prominent pastors among the group’s thousands of US congregations—faced abuse accusations over incidents spanning from the 1970s to present-day.More than 130 of them have been found guilty of rape, kidnapping, sexual assault, and a litany of other crimes, with most victims being children and teens, according to a database compiled by the Star-Telegram. Dozens of abusive pastors had multiple victims—one raped 11 girls in his congregation—and several had abused children as young as 7 years old.Victims repeatedly cited deference to pastoral authority as a factor for why they initially trusted their abusers and why it became so difficult to bring their wrongdoing ...Continue reading...
Improving our prevention and response to sexual violence will take sustained, significant efforts. We believe that the vast majority of people of faith, if asked, would state a sincere desire to respond to sexual violence with wisdom, justice and support for victims. Numerous narratives from survivors, however, caution us to consider that we vastly overestimate our readiness to respond well, and underestimate the challenges involved in doing so.Therefore, we do not place all our hopes in sharing a “to-do list” of strategies for churches. Clergy and leaders can have access to best practices, along with the resources to implement them, and still be stymied by powerful spiritual, psychological, and cultural influences.These forces complicate and countervail against wise application of knowledge and effective implementation of safeguarding and response measures. In the third of our reflections, we identify and urge consideration of a few of these complicating forces.1 – Human nature recoils from engagement with sexual violence.The first may seem an obvious truth, but it is essential to this conversation. Human nature seeks comfort and stability, and resists distress and disequilibrium. Anguish and disruption, however, are unavoidable when sexual violation touches the lives of individuals and those called to act in response.By their very nature, sexual violations, and their disclosures, throw individuals and systems into disarray. We are inclined to resist this level of disruption and recoil from coming into close contact with the physical, psychological, social and spiritual realities of sexual violence.However, there is no way to respond to these experiences with justice and accountability without encountering profound disruptions and palpable distress. Avoidance and minimization may temporarily reestablish ...Continue reading...
He came to divide sons from their fathers and daughters from their mothers—not to promote “family values.”An excerpt from CT’s Beautiful Orthodoxy Book of the Year. Here’s the full list of CT 2019 Book Award winners.When many people think of North American Christianity, one of the first words that come to mind would be family. Part of that is good, necessary, and unavoidable for a church on mission. If we are going to disciple people, we must teach them to keep themselves from idols (1 John 5:21), and many of the idols of our age come under the rubric of allegedly freeing people from the “constraints” of family responsibility and even family definition. When the outside culture valorizes sexual promiscuity, gender confusion, a divorce culture, and the upending of marriage, then the church must work hard to articulate a different vision. There is a danger, though, that comes with any mission, and this one is no exception.The outside world is interested in order and stability. In that sense, the world can see the value, in most cases, of “The Family” in a way that it would not see the value of, say, the doctrine of justification by faith. Churches can talk about the family, then, in ways that seem immediately relevant even to their most metaphysically disinterested neighbors. With the secularizing of Western culture, many churches find that their neighbors simply aren’t asking questions like “What will I say when God asks me, ‘Why should I let you into heaven?’ ” They find people are asking, “How can I find sexual fulfillment if I’m not married?” or “How can I stop arguing so much with my husband?” or “How can I relate to my kids during the teenage years?” For many churches, the family then becomes the point of contact with ...Continue reading...
Our picks for the books most likely to shape evangelical life, thought, and culture.There’s a funny graphic making the social media rounds that confirms a truth universally acknowledged, at least by bibliophiles. Under the heading “Do I need more books?” sits a pie chart partitioned into a big slice (in teal) and a much smaller slice (in yellow), representing the dueling impulses in play. Predictably enough, the teal portion depicts the overwhelming urge to answer with an emphatic “YES.” But then we confront the nagging, still small voice of conscience, whispering ever so delicately, “also YES, but in yellow.”As someone who owns a perfectly appropriate, not even slightly excessive, but still fairly large number of books, I know the feeling. Several years ago, I was part of a book club at church. We were discussing a book about books (Tony Reinke’s Lit!: A Christian Guide to Reading). At some point, I asked whether anyone else ever felt guilty about devoting too much time to reading, given all the other callings God places on our lives. One young woman in the group thought the question revealed more about the bookworm bubble I inhabited than any spiritual dilemma Christians commonly face. And of course she was right! (Thank goodness that levelheaded young woman later saw fit to become my wife.)If only through gritted teeth, you can usually get me to concede the sinful temptations that bookaholism encourages. Like any good gift, reading can be overindulged. But each year, as I set the table for another book awards banquet, I try to ease up on the introspection, adopting the literary equivalent of the “calories don’t count” mindset that fuels so many satisfying Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner binges.During book awards season, at least, the ...Continue reading...
6 Characteristics of a Disciple-Making Church—Part 2 In the previous blog, we noted that while it is easy to give lip service to the Great Commission as the mission of the local church, it is also easy to get distracted from it. We saw that a disciple-making church is actually a Christ-centered church. Our goal is not so much size as it is health, and a spiritually healthy church will be centered around Christ and His mission.In part 1, we looked at the following three characteristics. (If you have not had a chance to read the previous blog, I'd encourage you to read it quickly here before reading further.)A Christ-Centered Philosophy—Our goal to seek the lost and train disciples must be biblical and Christ-centered, not fleshly and ego-centered.A Christ-Centered Motivation—Any motive less than the love of Christ will be unsustainable. A Christ-Centered Approach—We must give consistent and thorough gospel presentations with purposeful and biblical follow up. But what then? What is it like for a new Christian just saved through the ministry of a Christ-centered, disciple-making church? This is where the following three characteristics come in: 4. A Christ-Centered EnvironmentBut we were gentle among you, even as a nurse cherisheth her children: So being affectionately desirous of you, we were willing to have imparted unto you, not the gospel of God only, but also our own souls, because ye were dear unto us.—1 Thessalonians 2:7–8A new Christian should be welcomed into a church that is intensely loving and fully Christ-centered. They need people who will come alongside them and point them to consistent growth in Jesus.This is why at Lancaster Baptist Church, we place a lot of emphasis on the Sunday morning adult connection groups or Sunday school classes. These provide great opportunities for acceptance and growth in a setting that easily lends itself to both Bible teaching and relationship building. It's so important that young Christians be pointed to Christ and to His Word, rather than being surrounded by contentious, frustrated, bitter Christians. A new Christian needs time to grow and encouragement in grace.5. A Christ-Centered DiscipleshipAnd when they had preached the gospel to that city, and had taught many, they returned again to Lystra, and to Iconium, and Antioch, Confirming the souls of the disciples, and exhorting them to continue in the faith, and that we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God.—Acts 14:21–22Discipleship is not a series of ten lessons. It is a life-long decision of daily following Christ. The very emphasis of the word disciple—follower—suggests that our focus is on Christ, not on ourselves or others.So at Lancaster Baptist Church, our goal in our discipleship curriculum is that we are pointing new Christians to Jesus through the series of one-on-one mentoring meetings. We want to help them establish a strong, daily walk with Christ and to become grounded in the foundational doctrines of His Word. In short, we want to point them to Christ—the living Word through the pages of His written Word.6. A Christ-Centered Pulpit MinistryFor the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God.—1 Corinthians 1:18Biblical preaching is primary in discipleship. It is foundational for establishing doctrine, reinforcing doctrine, and encouraging the disciple's faith and continued growth.And this is not just true for new disciples of Christ. Preaching is vital for all Christians.For these reasons, a disciple-making church has Christ-centered preaching. There may be illustrations, and there should definitely be applications. But the core message should always be the Bible—not opinion or fluff. When God's Word is preached, Christ is exalted, for He is the living Word. In part 1, I mentioned that a disciple-making church is a Christ-centered church. But the reverse is also true. A Christ-centered church will be a disciple-making church. In fact, a church that is centered on anything or anyone other than Christ may produce converts, but it will not produce disciples. From gospel-driven philosophy and motives to an others-focused outreach and church environment, to a biblically-grounded discipleship and pulpit ministry, it must all be centered around Jesus.This is the kind of church that produces fully-committed followers of Christ.
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